Evan Longoria signs six-year, $100 million extension with Rays

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Evan Longoria was already under the Rays’ control through 2016 thanks to a long-term contract he signed literally one week after his big-league debut in 2008, but today the two sides agreed to a six-year, $100 million extension that runs through 2022.

By combining the remainder of his previous contract and the $100 million extension Longoria will now be paid $136 million for the next 10 seasons. Tampa Bay also holds an option for 2023, potentially keeping him under contract through age 37. In other words, this is essentially a career-long commitment.

Tampa Bay made a very bold, unique move signing Longoria to a long-term deal days into his MLB career and this is another aggressive, interesting decision. Clearly the penny-pinching Rays couldn’t compete for a player like Longoria on the open market, but by taking on the considerable risk of a decade-long commitment to a player they already controlled for another four years they will be in line to get a significant discount if he stays healthy and productive into his 30s.

Of course, injuries have been a major issue for Longoria. He missed 88 games this year with a torn hamstring and was out for 28 games in 2011, but his production has never waned. Longoria hit .289 with 17 homers and an .896 OPS in 2012 and the No. 3 overall pick in the 2006 draft has an .877 career OPS that ranks third among all active third basemen behind only Alex Rodriguez and David Wright (and the retiring Chipper Jones).

Red Sox to extend protective netting at Fenway Park in 2018

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The Red Sox are the latest team to extend the protective netting at their ballpark this winter. According to a statement by club president Sam Kennedy, the exact dimensions of the netting have yet to be determined, but it will likely stretch “all the way to Field Box 79, down the left field line and then all the way down to almost Canvas Alley in the Field Box 9 area.”

Fenway Park received additional protective netting prior to the 2016 season, when the netting behind home plate was lengthened to the home and visitor dugouts. Per Kennedy’s statement, the current expansion should cover everything but the outfield corners, making it nearly impossible for a line drive foul to reach fans in the lower boxes.

After a toddler sustained serious injuries from a 105-MPH foul ball to the face at Yankee Stadium last September, over half of all MLB teams decided to take more extreme preventative measures in advance of the 2018 season. The Brewers, Cardinals, Braves, Astros, Royals, Pirates, Rangers, Padres, Nationals, Mariners, Phillies, Mets, Reds, Blue Jays, Giants, Yankees, Twins and Indians are among the organizations to address the issue over the last several years, while others have yet to take significant action.