When will people stop asking “what would George do?”

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George Steinbrenner has been dead since 2010. While obviously still active, he ceded real day-to-day control of the team to Gene Michael and others following his reinstatement in the early 1990s. He stopped having any substantive role of the New York Yankees at least by 2006, and probably earlier than that due to declining health. Since George stopped being the defacto general manager the team has won five World Series titles, seven pennants, has made the playoffs seventeen times and won thousands of games.

Nevertheless, this was Joel Sherman’s column in yesterday’s New York Post:

source:

Since George Steinbrenner stopped being the George Steinbrenner of legend and lore, the Yankees have experienced astounding success, both as a baseball team and as a business. Their run has rivaled the greatest runs in the Yankees’ storied history. It is not hyperbole to say that since the team’s repudiation of George Steinbrenner’s 1970s and 1980s managerial style, they have resumed their role as the gold standard for a professionally-run baseball franchise.

In light of that, why would anyone find it at all reasonable or useful to frame a story about the future of the New York Yankees in “what would George do?” style?  It seems just as relevant to ask what would Ed Barrow do, or what would Larry MacPhail do.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

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Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.

Luis Valbuena to miss four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring

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Angels first baseman Luis Valbuena will miss the next four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring, Pedro Moura of the Los Angeles Times reports.

Valbuena, 31, signed a two-year, $15 million contract with the Angels in January and was on track to get the lion’s share of the playing time at first base. While he’s out, however, C.J. Cron will handle first base on a regular basis. When Valbeuna returns, the two will likely form a platoon.

Last year with the Astros, Valbuena hit a solid .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances.