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Dan Plesac and Doug Glanville out of running for Cubs’ TV job, Jim Deshaies will interview


Patrick Mooney of has an update on the Cubs’ search for Bob Brenly’s replacement:

You can add at least one more name to the list: Jim Deshaies. Sources confirmed the longtime Houston Astros color analyst recently interviewed for the job.

Another source said that Dan Plesac – who was viewed as a frontrunner – informed WGN on Friday that he’s withdrawing from consideration and will remain at the MLB Network.

Doug Glanville, who was rumored to be in the running, is now working on a contract extension with ESPN. He serves as an analyst from time to time on “Baseball Tonight” and contributes columns to

Rick Sutcliffe, Eric Karros, Gary Matthews, and Todd Hollandsworth are thought to be alive as contenders.

Brenly left his post as color commentator on the Cubs broadcasts in October for the same job in the Diamondbacks’ booth. He makes his home in the desert and led the Snakes to a World Series title in ’01.

Jason Kipnis plans to play through a disgusting-looking ankle sprain

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 14:  Jason Kipnis #22 of the Cleveland Indians fields the ball against the Toronto Blue Jays during game one of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 14, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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Jason Kipnis sprained his ankle while celebrating the Indians ALCS win over the Blue Jays. In the runup to tonight’s game, Terry Francona has said that Kipnis would be fine, that he’s a gamer, etc., etc. You know, the usual “when the bell rings, all of the aches and pains go away” kind of thing.

Today, however, we see that this sprained ankle is maybe not your run-of-the-mill late season bump or bruise:


Um, yikes.

Indians beat writer jumps in Lake Erie to settle a bet

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Back in September Cleveland Plain Dealer beat writer Paul Hoynes ruffled a lot of feathers when he declared the Indians DOA. His rationale: too many injuries to Indians starters weakened the club too greatly. Even if they did make the playoffs, Hoynes argued, they wouldn’t go far.

A reader made a bet with him at the time: if the Indians didn’t make the World Series, he’d jump in Lake Erie. If they did, Hoynes would.

Today Hoynes made good on his bet. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen a baseball writer drop trou, by the way: