If you’re in the opinion business, be prepared to defend your opinions

44 Comments

I will preface this by saying that I am certain — 100% certain — that a lot of people out there in Internet land said rude, personal and otherwise awful things to baseball writers who argued in favor of Miguel Cabrera for the MVP.  There were also people who likely said rude, personal and otherwise awful things to people who supported Mike Trout. Indeed, people say rude, personal and otherwise awful things to anyone who says anything about anything, because that’s how the Internet works, unfortunately.

But setting aside those rude, personal and otherwise awful sentiments from rude and awful people, I am not going to have much sympathy for baseball writers who are upset that people take issue with their opinions and analysis.

I am not going to link to any specific examples of upset baseball writers because the point is not to go after any specific person today.  But I have seen some pretty unfortunate reactions from professional writers in the past 24 hours. Writers who are shocked, angered or more than mildly annoyed that folks dare criticize them for their opinions about the MVP (and other things). The sentiments range from ruffled feathers and hurt feelings to full-on shock that their views are being questioned. And it’s not just in response to people saying “you’re a jackwagon and I hate you!”  It has also come in response to people saying “that doesn’t make sense, and here’s why …”

Look, folks:  If you put your opinions out into the world, don’t act surprised or offended when people take issue. That’s how discourse works. Saying “I believe what you said is wrong, and here is why I think that” is healthy, despite what a lot of people think. It’s how most institutions get to the bottom of things. Peer review. Political discourse. That kind of thing. I know that sports writers have not traditionally had to deal with that, but in this day and age you cannot pretend that the opinions you put out in the world aren’t subject to criticism.  Especially when it comes to awards and Hall of Fame voting, because in those instances writers are not merely writers. They are news makers too.

By the way: that goes for the bloggy/Internet writers just as much as it goes for the old school people too. One thing I’ve seen a lot more of lately than I used to are blogger types who assert something, catch flak, and then act horrified that people aren’t agreeing with them. That’s pathetic, folks. Bloggy people should, more than anyone, be cool with things getting chippy.

But either way:  If you are going to dish it out, be prepared to take it. And we should — in the interest of furthering knowledge and enlightenment — be dishing it out, as long as we’re not doing so in way that is rude, personal and otherwise awful.

Video: Aaron Judge mashes his first career grand slam

Getty Images
Leave a comment

It was only a matter of time before rookie sensation Aaron Judge clubbed his first grand slam. The Yankees’ power-hitting outfielder went deep in the third inning of Sunday’s series finale against the Athletics, clearing the bases with his 16th home run of the season and first career grand slam.

According to Statcast, the ball traveled an estimated 378 feet into the right field bleachers, Judge’s second-shortest home run to date. It also marked his first homer since May 20 and sixth in the past month. Entering Sunday’s game, the 22-year-old outfielder is batting .316/.421/.665 with a league-leading 36 hits in 183 PA.

The blast padded the Yankees’ lead in the third inning, giving them a three-run edge over the A’s as Michael Pineda looked for his sixth win of the year. They currently lead 7-3 in the bottom of the seventh.

Astros place Charlie Morton on disabled list with strained lat

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Astros placed right-hander Charlie Morton on the 10-day disabled list with a strained right lat muscle, the team announced on Sunday. The move is retroactive to May 25, when Morton reported feeling some soreness after his start against the Tigers last Wednesday. He’ll be shut down from throwing for a week and will concede his roster spot to right-handed reliever Jordan Jankowski for the time being. The team has yet to announce a specific timetable for his return to the mound.

Morton, 33, shouldered a 4.06 ERA through his first 10 starts of the season. His 3.6 BB/9 and 10.1 SO/9 were accompanied by a significant uptick in velocity, averaging a career-best 96 m.p.h. on his fastball in recent outings. This is the righty’s first disabled list stint since 2016, when he missed all but four games of the season with a torn hamstring.

Without Morton, fellow right-hander Mike Fiers is expected to retain his place in the rotation. He was reportedly in line for a demotion to the bullpen after producing an abysmal 5.21 ERA through his first 46 2/3 innings of the season. Brad Peacock, who made a spotless spot start for for the Astros last Monday, will fill out the rotation during Morton’s DL stint.