Occupy Comiskey! Jerry Reinsdorf explains the new White Sox ticket prices

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Last month, the White Sox announced they would lower ticket prices for many if not most tickets. Owner Jerry Reinsdorf explained the rationale to Dan Hayes of CSNChicago.com:

“If you take the so-called good seats, the premier seats, they were the fourth cheapest in all of baseball,” Reinsdorf said at Major League Baseball’s owners meetings, which conclude Thursday. “But then when you got into the lesser-quality seats, they were among the highest in baseball. So what we did was rebalance it. We raised the prices significantly on the inside seats and we’ve cut the prices substantially on the outside seats just to get where they ought to be.”

Based on what I learned from the recent campaign, this is class warfare and is giving gifts to the takers while punishing the people who create jobs and built that and blah, blah, blah.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.