Carl Crawford expected to be ready for Opening Day

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Carl Crawford was limited to just 31 games in the majors this season prior to undergoing Tommy John surgery on his left elbow in August. Pitchers usually need around a year to get back into game action, but position players can return sooner. That’s what the Dodgers are hoping for, anyway.

Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti told Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times this evening that he expects Crawford to be ready for Opening Day if he can avoid setbacks. If he can do it, he would be just over eight months removed from the surgery.

There was some chatter over the weekend that the Dodgers were pursuing Torii Hunter with Crawford and Matt Kemp coming off surgeries, but that would make him a pretty expensive insurance policy, especially with Andre Ethier still on the roster. Hunter is drawing plenty of interest right now and is likely to sign with a club where he has a defined full-time role.

Crawford was acquired from the Red Sox at the end of August along with Adrian Gonzalez, Josh Beckett and Nick Punto. The 31-year-old outfielder still has five years and $102.5 million remaining on his contract.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.