Mike Hampton, Tim Bogar join Angels’ minor league staff

2 Comments

According to Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times, the Angels have hired Mike Hampton and Tim Bogar to join their minor league staff. Bogar will be the manager with Double-A Arkansas while Hampton will serve as his pitching coach. The pair were teammates with the Astros from 1997-1999.

Bogar joins the Angels after serving as a coach with the Red Sox for the past four seasons. This included a drama-filled stint as Bobby Valentine’s bench coach this season. Bogar turned down a bench coach gig with the Astros last month in hopes that he would still be in Boston’s plans, but it was announced a couple of weeks ago that he wouldn’t be back. He’s only 46 years old, so while it has to be disappointing that he didn’t find an opportunity with a major league staff, there’s still plenty of time for him to build his resume as a potential managerial candidate.

As for Hampton, this will be his first coaching job. Now 40 years old, he retired prior to the 2011 season. The two-time All-Star compiled a 148-115 record and a 4.06 ERA over parts of 16 major league seasons with the Astros, Braves, Rockies, Diamondbacks, Mets and Mariners.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
2 Comments

ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.