Hall of Famer Lee MacPhail passes away at age 95

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Lee MacPhail, the Hall of Fame baseball executive and father of former Orioles, Cubs, and Twins general manager Andy MacPhail, has passed away at age 95.

MacPhail’s father, Larry MacPhail, is also in the Hall of Fame, making them the only father-son duo in Cooperstown.

Here’s an excerpt from the press release MLB sent announcing his death:

Beginning with the Yankees in 1949, MacPhail served as the Farm Director and Player Personnel Director for 10 years, building a system that led the team to seven World Series championships and nine pennants during his tenure.

In 1959, he became the general manager for the Baltimore Orioles, laying the groundwork for the 1966 World Series championship team as well as one of the most successful franchises in the modern era.

In 1965, MacPhail became the chief administrative assistant to newly elected commissioner William Eckert. The Sporting News named him Executive of the Year in 1966. He then returned to the Yankees as general manager from 1967 to 1973 before being elected president of the American League.

Condolences to one of the most important, influential families in baseball history.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.