The Mets restore their Gulf Coast League team

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Last winter the Mets dropped their Gulf Coast League team. It was portrayed by some as a sort of desperate cost-cutting move because the Wilpons were broke, etc., but that never really made a ton of sense. a GCL team costs less than a million bucks a year to operate. It was more likely that the Mets were just seeking an efficiency given that they already had three rookie league operations and more minor league teams than any other franchise.

Whatever it was about doesn’t matter now, though, because they’re getting back in the GCL:

A year after eliminating their Gulf Coast League team in a cost-saving maneuver, the Mets have restored the squad for 2013 … The reintroduction of the GCL team, which primarly is for newly signed players, is necessary because the new collective bargaining agreement results in draftees signing more quickly — in time to participate in games within weeks of the draft in large numbers, according to the Mets.

So, if you have a hankering to sit outside and watch Mets baseball in Florida during the dog days of summer, head to Port St. Lucie this summer and check out the hot, hot GCL action.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”