Phillies and Kevin Frandsen avoid arbitration by agreeing to new contract

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UPDATE: ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that Frandsen will make a base salary of $850,000. The deal includes incentives which could bring the overall payout to $1.2 million.

11:35 PM: According to Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com, the Phillies and Kevin Frandsen have avoided arbitration by agreeing to a new contract. Terms aren’t yet available, but it doesn’t figure to be much since he’s arbitration-eligible for the first time this winter.

Frandsen spent the entire first half of this season with Triple-A Lehigh Valley, but received significant playing time at third base with the big club after the All-Star break, batting .338/.383/.451 with two home runs, 14 RBI and an .834 OPS in 210 plate appearances. His strong play pushed Placido Polanco to the bench down the stretch.

It’s possible the Phillies will go into next season with a platoon of Frandsen and Freddy Galvis at third base, but general manager Ruben Amaro, Jr. will certainly look for ways to improve in both the free agent and trade markets. While Frandsen was a nice surprise in a small sample this year thanks to a high line drive rate and batting average on balls in play, the 30-year-old had a .243/.302/.335 batting line and a .636 OPS over his previous 626 plate appearances in the majors. With regression likely on the way, it would be unwise to count on him as anything more than a utility infielder next year.

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.