At the GM meetings replay, expanded September rosters, pitcher headgear on the agenda

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We’ve been handling the transaction developments from the GM meetings — Walt Weiss’ hiring, the Jason Bay thing, etc. — in individual posts, but there are a couple of catchall items being discussed by the baseball brass at Indian Wells.

Replay is one.  We’ve long known that some expansion is coming, likely to fair/foul calls and to trapped balls. But Joe Torre says that maybe more is being discussed:

“[Bud Selig] was talking about really basically fair-foul, trap plays. But we’re looking into more than that,” said Joe Torre, MLB’s executive vice president for baseball operations. Torre did not detail what types of calls a broader expansion might include.

Seems like, if baseball is going to go incremental with it, the next logical step would be outs on the basepaths. Tags at second on steals, perhaps, if they wish to avoid reviewing plays with mutliple baserunners in motion. Force outs at first base. That’s just my speculation, of course.  Also:

GMs also discussed altering the longtime rule allowing active rosters to expand from 25 to 40 from Sept. 1 through the rest of the regular season. Some teams have been reluctant to use the larger limit late in the season. They have cited not wanting to disrupt minor league teams in their playoffs, and those decisions have led to big league games in which teams have differing numbers of available players.

One solution mentioned earlier this year, and mentioned by Torre yesterday, was having set expanded roster numbers in September. Rather than allowing teams to differ, with some having the same old 25 and others having up to 40 guys in the dugout, you can expand up to say 28 or 30 available per game, firm, and use any number of minor leaguers to fill those extra spots on a day-by-day basis.

Finally, there was talk about head protection for pitchers, ranging from helmets to Kevlar-lined caps.  These are preliminary discussions, however, and a full report on the feasibility and utility of such measures is due to be given teams at the Winter Meetings next month.

Yoenis Cespedes blames a lack of golf for his early season slump

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Back during the 2015 playoffs the sorts of New York media types who love to find reasons to criticize players for petty reasons decided to criticize Yoenis Cespedes for playing golf the day of a playoff game. The Mets won the series with the Cubs during which the controversy, such as it was, occurred and it was soon dropped.

It was picked back up again in 2016 when Cespedes, while on the disabled list with a strained quad, was seen playing golf. Despite the fact that everyone involved said that golf did not contribute to his injury and that golf would have no impact on his injured quad, it was deemed “a bad look” by a columnist looking to get some mileage out of bashing Cespedes for having a hobby that probably half of all ballplayers share. They did it when he showed off his fancy cars too, by the way, even though just about every ballplayer has a fancy car or three. When you’re a superstar in New York — especially when you’re one with whom the media is not particularly close for various reasons — you’re going to catch hell for seemingly nothing.

Now there’s a new twist to the Cespedes golf saga. Yoenis himself says that his poor start — he’s hitting .195/.258/.354 and leads the league in strikeouts — is due to . . . not enough golf! From the New York Times:

He gave a possible reason for the poor start this weekend: not playing enough golf, a hobby beloved by many baseball players. And, yes, he is serious.

“In previous seasons, one of the things I did when I wasn’t going well was to play golf,” he said after a game on Friday in which he struck out four times but still drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th inning. “This year, I’m not playing golf.”

The story says Cespedes quit golf last summer because he worried that it was contributing to hamstring problems. He’s thinking about going back to it soon, as he thinks it’ll help his swing. Given that he’ll catch hell either way, he may as well do what he wants.