Sorry, dudes: Legal marijuana in Colorado and Washington does not mean Rockies and Mariners can smoke pot


One of the more interesting developments in yesterday’s election was Colorado and Washington legalizing marijuana.

Maybe this is just, like, my opinion man, but given how poor the results of the war on drugs have been, this move should be applauded. And even if you’re not pro-pot in any way shape or form, it’s a great moment for the whole states-as-laboratories-of-democracy thing. Maybe it works. Maybe it doesn’t. But no matter what happens, we’ll actually know more about the pros and cons of our nation’s drug laws in a few years as a result. As of now, we’re just flying blind. And kinda crashing, actually.

Of course it’s great for comedy too because, let’s face it, stoners are rather ridiculous in their own endearing way, and the jokes that arise from this sort of thing can be a lot of fun. Jokes like this one:

But you can save them as far as baseball is concerned. Because the legality of pot in Colorado and Washington will have no bearing on the Joint Drug Agreement:


Which should not be surprising given how the performance enhancing drug rules work. Many PEDs are perfectly legal but banned by the league. And weed is going to stay the same way.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.