When it comes to performance enhancing drugs, Romney beats Obama

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Because the election season hasn’t been long or tortuous enough, Mitt Romney and President Obama were interviewed by Chris Berman on Monday Night Football last night. Which seems like a waste of time, because if you’re still an undecided voter on the evening of November 5 you’re probably unlikely to have the proper cognitive skills to operate your car to get you to the polls this morning anyway. But hey, they talked about sports, so that’s fun.

I don’t really care what Obama thinks about the Chicago Bears or the college football playoff thing, and I don’t really care what Romney thinks of the Red Sox and Patriots. We all have our rah-rahs. But this answer from Romney about what he thinks is the biggest issue in sports was interesting:

“It has to be the specter of drugs — and performance enhancing drugs of all kinds,” he said. “We have to continue to battle that. We have to make sure that our technology keeps up with the people that are trying to skirt around the law. … We’re going to have to change the culture that says to people, using performance enhancing drugs is acceptable. It is simply not.”

Obama didn’t touch that last night, but in October 2008, as a challenger, he sure did during a radio appearance:

“As a father and an avid sports fan, I understand the dangers that performance enhancing drugs pose for athletes, as well as the teenagers who seek to emulate them, not to mention the effect that these drugs have on the integrity of sports. As president, I would use the bully pulpit of my office to warn Americans about the dangers of performance enhancing drugs, and I would put greater resources into enforcement of existing drug laws. I would also convene a summit of the commissioners of the professional sports leagues, as well as university presidents, to explore options for decreasing the use of these drugs.”

Greater resources into enforcement? Thanks, dude. While it isn’t of extreme importance compared to most of what happens in government, the DOJ’s show trials of PED users is one of the dumbest and more pointless things the government has done in the past four years.

I’m gonna vote later today and based on stuff I’ve written before you probably know how I’m gonna vote. But I will freely admit that I would much prefer it if the government’s involvement in sports controversies was more akin to Romney’s “working to change the culture” talk than Obama’s “putting greater resources into enforcement” jazz.  Government has enough to do without increasing the intensity of its increasingly feckless war on drugs,* let alone the singularly feckless PED battles within that war.

*No, I’m not under any delusion that Romney would ratchet back the overall war on drugs anymore than Obama would. When it comes to that stuff the major parties seem to be in similar, idiotic lockstep.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

*

Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.