U.S. Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Governor Romney and his wife Ann wait for the start of the final U.S. presidential debate beside their son Tagg in Boca Raton, Florida

Mitt Romney’s son was briefly a Dodgers executive “who was just in way over his head”

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Back in 2005, when they were owned by the McCourts, the Dodgers needed a new chief marketing officer and decided to hire then-Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s oldest son, Tagg Romney.

Steve Dilbeck of the Los Angeles Times writes that Tagg Romney “was woefully unqualified to be a baseball team’s marketing executive” and “his one claim to previous sports marketing was at Reebok, where he was something called vice president for on-field marketing … his primary responsibility was to watch NFL and NBA games, counting how many times Reebok was mentioned or its logo caught on camera.”

Around a year later he left the job to join his father’s first presidential campaign and Dodgers sources told Dilbeck that Romney was a “very nice guy who was just in way over his head” and a “vacuous-eyed, transparent political appointment.”

Romney still has his own “executives” page on the Dodgers’ team website, the top of which looks like this:

source:

Tim Tebow hits a homer in his first instructional league at bat

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 20: Tim Tebow #15 of the New York Mets hits a home run at an instructional league day at Tradition Field on September 20, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Because of course he did.

It wasn’t just his first at bat, but it was his first pitch. It came off of John Kilichowski, an 11th round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals out of Vanderbilt.  The ball went out to left center, off the bat of the lefty Tebow.

Next time, meat, throw him a breaking ball.

 

Joaquin Benoit blames overly-sensitive hitters for benches-clearing incidents

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 12: Joaquin Benoit #53 of the Toronto Blue Jays delivers a pitch in the seventh inning during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 12, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The other night, Blue Jays reliever Joaquin Benoit needed help getting off the field after the second benches-clearing incident with the Yankees. It was later revealed that Benoit tore a calf muscle during the fracas, ending his season.

Yesterday he pointed the finger at just about everyone else for the incidents like the one that led to his injury. Hitters specifically. From The Star:

“I believe as pitchers we’re entitled to use the whole plate and pitch in if that’s the way we’re going to succeed,” Benoit said. “I believe that right now baseball is taking things so far that in some situations most hitters believe that they can’t be brushed out. Some teams take it personally.”

That “take it personally” line is interesting coming from Benoit as, in this instance, it seemed pretty clear that the whole plunking exchange which led to his injury started because Josh Donaldson took an inside pitch that did not seem to be a purpose pitch at all, too personally.

Did Benoit take a veiled swipe at his teammate here? If so, that’s pretty notable. If not it’s notable in another way, right? As it suggests that Benoit believes it’s OK for his teammates to take issue with inside pitches but anyone else who does is part of the problem?

Which is it, Joaquin?