Mitt Romney’s son was briefly a Dodgers executive “who was just in way over his head”

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Back in 2005, when they were owned by the McCourts, the Dodgers needed a new chief marketing officer and decided to hire then-Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s oldest son, Tagg Romney.

Steve Dilbeck of the Los Angeles Times writes that Tagg Romney “was woefully unqualified to be a baseball team’s marketing executive” and “his one claim to previous sports marketing was at Reebok, where he was something called vice president for on-field marketing … his primary responsibility was to watch NFL and NBA games, counting how many times Reebok was mentioned or its logo caught on camera.”

Around a year later he left the job to join his father’s first presidential campaign and Dodgers sources told Dilbeck that Romney was a “very nice guy who was just in way over his head” and a “vacuous-eyed, transparent political appointment.”

Romney still has his own “executives” page on the Dodgers’ team website, the top of which looks like this:

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Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.