Injured prospect Alfredo Silverio gets dropped from Dodgers’ 40-man

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Outfielder Alfredo Silverio, who was ranked as the Dodgers’ No. 4 prospect by Baseball America before suffering serious injuries in a car accident in January, was sent outright to Triple-A on Sunday.

Silverio missed the entire 2012 season with a concussion and other injuries sustained in the accident. He had Tommy John surgery on his throwing elbow in May.

The right-handed-hitting Silverio broke through as a 24-year-old in Double-A in 2011, hitting .306/.340/.542 with 16 homers and 85 RBI in 533 at-bats. If not for the accident, he would have been a definite candidate to see time in the Dodger outfield last season with Matt Kemp hurt and left field often unsettled.

Silverio will remain in the Dodgers organization, but it’s unclear when he might resume playing in the minors. That no team claimed Silverio off waivers suggest that he’s still a ways off from getting back on to the field.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”