Pascual Perez fight

Two of Pascual Perez’s greatest hits


Still bummed over the news of the death of Pascual Perez.  When I first started thinking about him I, and probably a ton of other people, immediately first thought of him being lost on I-285, desperately looking for the ballpark and ultimately missing his start because of it. A ballpark that was not, it should be noted, situated on or anywhere near I-285.

But there were a couple of other memorable Pascual Perez moments. Two that come to mind were rather ugly, but time and, sadly, uglier things, make us look a bit more fondly on them.

First was a brawl. Not the one you’re thinking of. That one is below. The one I’m thinking of took place on August 25, 1981 when Perez’s Pittsburgh Pirates faced the Los Angels Dodgers. Chris Jaffe wrote a full rundown last year.  The upshot: Perez plunked a couple of Dodgers. Reggie Smith took umbrage and made motions toward the Pirates dugout.  Nothing happened until …

After ending the inning, Perez motioned to Smith he’d meet him under the stands—pronto. Smith and Perez both raced through their clubhouses and into the tunnels, meeting up behind home plate under the stands. Both dugouts emptied following them. Players came, coaches came, even managers Chuck Tanner and Tommy Lasorda came.

The fight, like most fights, wasn’t much of a fight. Some stadium officials said there was some shoving, but no punches thrown. By the time the umpires tracked everyone down, the incident was already over. There were no ejections, and Perez pitched one more inning.

That’s pro wrestling stuff right there. Other than when Prince Fielder rushed the Dodgers clubhouse a few years ago, I can’t recall such a thing happening.

The second one is that famous brawl. A brawl the likes of which you never ever see in the majors anymore. Guys make too much money and know too many other players for things to escalate like this, I reckon.  But back in 1984 it was a different story.  It started when Pascual Perez hit Alan Wiggins. Which led to retaliation by Ed Whitson against Perez when he came to bat, which led to a huge fight. A fight which, if you watch the video below, you note that Perez just strolled away from without having a punch thrown at him:

In all, there were brawls in the second, fifth, eighth and ninth innings of this ONE game. One of them involved Champ Summers — who just passed away himself in recent weeks — with a Leeroy Jenkins rush of the Braves dugout. Though we’d all be horrified at such a thing happening in a game today, with nearly 30 years of distance, the whole affair was almost glorious in a perverse way.

Both the 1981 Dodgers and the 1984 Padres went to the World Series, so maybe Perez was a galvanizing force.

RIP Perimeter Perez.

Game 2 will be played one way or another

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 26:  Grounds crew workers prepare the field prior to Game Two of the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field on October 26, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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The weather in Cleveland is not that great at the moment. It’s cold, windy, there’s drizzle and the chance for heavier rain increases as the night wears on. At the moment Game 2 of the World Series is still scheduled to kick off at 7:08PM Eastern Time, however. So bundle up.

And maybe hunker down. Because this game is going to go nine innings no matter what. Maybe not tonight, but eventually.

That’s because, you may recall, ever since that rainy, snowy mix forced the suspension in the sixth inning of Game 5 of the 2008 World Series between the Phillies and the Rays, Major League Baseball has held that all playoff games will be played in their entirety. There will be no six-inning, rain-shortened affairs.

The last word from MLB was that they would reassess the weather just before starting pitchers began to warm up this evening. If things still look about the same then, the game will proceed as scheduled. If the weather takes a turn for the worse, they’ll suspend the game and pick it up where it leaves off tomorrow.

A guy gave up his airline seat to Kenny Lofton, cashes in big

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Former Cleveland Indians outfielder Kenny Lofton reacts prior to throwing out the first pitch prior to Game One of the 2016 World Series against the Chicago Cubs at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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A man named Ken Kostal of Marblehead, Ohio was just trying to get home from Los Angeles yesterday morning. He looked over and saw former Indians great Kenny Lofton in the boarding area, trying to fly standby to Cleveland. Why was Lofton trying to get to Cleveland? To throw out the first pitch in last night’s Game 1 of the World Series, of course.

Kostal gave up his seat to Lofton and Lofton made it to Cleveland in time. But don’t weep for Kostal. He got more than a ticket on the next flight and some federally-mandated bonus cash. The Indians just announced that they are giving Kostal tickets for Game 6, if necessary. In addition, United Airlines is giving Kostal 62,200 miles for his use on a future flight. Why 62,200? Because Lofton had 622 career stolen bases.

That’s pretty dang sweet. And now Kostal is probably rooting for the Tribe to drop a couple of games so he can go to the World Series on the house.