Three months ago Marco Scutaro was playing poorly on a last-place team

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Marco Scutaro hit .362 in 61 regular season games for the Giants, was named MVP of the NLCS, and delivered the World Series-winning hit in Game 4 last night.

It was one helluva stint in San Francisco for the 37-year-old veteran and made even more amazing by the fact that three months ago Scutaro was playing for a last-place team and playing pretty poorly too.

Before the Rockies traded Scutaro to the Giants on July 27 he hit just .271 with a .324 on-base percentage and .361 slugging percentage in 95 games. To put in some context, consider that Scutaro’s batting average (.362) with the Giants was higher than his slugging percentage (.361) with the Rockies and his .684 OPS for Colorado was the worst mark of his entire career despite calling Coors Field home.

Away from the best hitter’s ballpark in baseball Scutaro hit .238 with a .570 OPS in 47 games for the Rockies, who traded him for a non-prospect and then watched him hit .362 in the regular season and .328 in the postseason.

Scutaro said it best when asked about his journey from playing poorly on a last-place team to starring on the World Series winners: “This is a dream come true. If anybody would’ve told me in late June that I was going to be in the World Series, or I was going to be a world champ, I would’ve slapped you in the face.”

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.