Three months ago Marco Scutaro was playing poorly on a last-place team

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Marco Scutaro hit .362 in 61 regular season games for the Giants, was named MVP of the NLCS, and delivered the World Series-winning hit in Game 4 last night.

It was one helluva stint in San Francisco for the 37-year-old veteran and made even more amazing by the fact that three months ago Scutaro was playing for a last-place team and playing pretty poorly too.

Before the Rockies traded Scutaro to the Giants on July 27 he hit just .271 with a .324 on-base percentage and .361 slugging percentage in 95 games. To put in some context, consider that Scutaro’s batting average (.362) with the Giants was higher than his slugging percentage (.361) with the Rockies and his .684 OPS for Colorado was the worst mark of his entire career despite calling Coors Field home.

Away from the best hitter’s ballpark in baseball Scutaro hit .238 with a .570 OPS in 47 games for the Rockies, who traded him for a non-prospect and then watched him hit .362 in the regular season and .328 in the postseason.

Scutaro said it best when asked about his journey from playing poorly on a last-place team to starring on the World Series winners: “This is a dream come true. If anybody would’ve told me in late June that I was going to be in the World Series, or I was going to be a world champ, I would’ve slapped you in the face.”

Video: Corey Dickerson breaks scoreless tie with walk-off home run

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Neither the Pirates nor the Tigers could manage any offense during Thursday afternoon’s game at PNC Park. That is, until outfielder Corey Dickerson launched a walk-off solo home run off of Alex Wilson with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning.

Dickerson, 28, has been solid for the Pirates for the first month of the season. He’s batting .314/.348/.500 with a pair of home runs, 13 RBI, and 13 runs scored in 92 plate appearances. The Pirates acquired him from the Rays in late February in exchange for journeyman pitcher Daniel Hudson and Single-A infielder Tristan Gray.