miguel cabrera media getty

Miguel Cabrera did not talk to reporters after Game 3 loss

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Remember when the Cardinals’ Albert Pujols skipped a session with the media following last year’s World Series Game 2 loss to the Rangers and everyone made a big stink about it? Now the Tigers’ Miguel Cabrera is traveling that same road.

According to ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick, Cabrera “was showered, dressed and heading out the door as the media arrived” in the Tigers’ clubhouse after Saturday night’s Game 3 loss to the Giants. Prince Fielder stayed behind to answer questions, as did many of Detroit’s other prominent players. But Cabrera wanted no part.

Here is Crasnick’s take on Miggy’s decision to bolt:

Superstars and team leaders have an obligation to stand at their lockers on good days and bad, and Cabrera failed the leadership test by fleeing the scene and leaving his teammates to face a never-ending assault of questions about the Tigers’ offensive futility.

The leadership angle also got heavy play when Pujols went silent, and it seems a little silly in both cases. Cabrera should have stayed because he’s a professional and speaking with the people who cover his sport is part of the profession, but do his teammates really think less of him because he didn’t want to talk after a third straight World Series loss? Haven’t his teammates already formed their opinions on what kind of guy he is? And don’t they care more about his on-field production than anything? The media has a right to be upset, but to suggest that Cabrera walking out would form some sort of rift in the Detroit clubhouse is, well, projecting.

Pujols went on to crank three home runs the next game. We’ll see what Miggy has in store Sunday night.

The White Sox will retire Mark Buehrle’s number this June

CHICAGO, IL - SEPTEMBER 27:  Starting pitcher Mark Buehrle #56 of the Chicago White Sox waves to the crowd after being tasken out of a game against the Toronto Blue Jays at U.S. Cellular Field on September 27, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Mark Buehrle last pitched in 2015, for the Toronto Blue Jays. He was still pretty effective and toyed with the idea of pitching last season, but he never signed anywhere and is, for all intents and purposes, retired.

Now at least his number will be retired officially. It will be done by the club for which he had the most success and with which he is, obviously, most associated:

Buehrle pitched for the White Sox for 12 years. He was the model of consistency and durability in Chicago, logging over 200 innings a season in every single season but his rookie year, when he was primarily a reliever. He was a solid defender, a multi-time All-Star, tossed a perfect game in 2009 and helped the Chisox to their first World Series title in 88 years in 2005.

He was also one of baseball’s fastest workers, so I’m going to assume that, in his honor, the number retirement ceremony will last, like, a minute 20, after which everyone can get on with their dang day.

Terry Francona isn’t sure how long his health will allow him to manage

BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 19:  Terry Francona #17 of the Cleveland Indians reacts during batting practice before a game with the Boston Red Sox on August 19, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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Terry Francona just won the American League pennant, the Manager of the Year Award and his Cleveland Indians will likely be among the favorites to win it all in 2017. Between that and his 17-year track record as one of the best managers in the business, he will have a job, somewhere, for as long as he wants one.

He said yesterday, however, that his body will likely limit how long he manages:

“It gets harder and harder physically. It really does. It takes me longer to recharge every year . . . I’ve had a lot of surgeries, a lot of health problems. It just takes a toll on you. I love [the game of baseball]. I really do, but I can’t see myself doing something else. But there is going to come a day when I feel like I’m shortchanging the team or the organization. That’s not fair.

“Even now, during batting practice, I’ll come in and get off my feet a little bit. I think everybody understands. But when there comes a day when it gets in the way, I’m going to have to pull back, and it’s not because I don’t love managing. You have to have a certain amount of energy to do this job right.”

Francona experienced some chest pains and had an elevated heart rate that caused him to leave a game early last season. In 2005 a similar episode caused him to miss three games while managing the Red Sox. He also has a history of embolisms and blood clots, some of which have hospitalized him.

With multiple World Series rings there isn’t much more in baseball that Francona can accomplish, but here’s hoping he sticks around and accomplishes a lot more before he trades in his baseball spikes for golf spikes and calls it a career.