Ex-bench coach Tim Bogar says Bobby Valentine is “completely wrong”

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Tim Bogar, who spent this season as Bobby Valentine’s bench coach, responded to the former manager’s comments about the Red Sox coaching staff undermining him by saying Valentine is “completely wrong.”

“That bothers me because of what the coaches went through this year and what we dealt with,” Bogar said, via Joe McDonald of ESPN Boston. “The coaching staff was prepared to do everything that we were supposed to do to help Bobby succeed, but not once did he portray what he wanted us to do to help him and eventually he shut some of us out completely.”

Earlier this month, before being fired, Valentine said during a radio interview that he felt the coaching staff undermined him and last night in an interview with Bob Costas on NBC Sports Network he made similar comments and said: “I should have made sure the coaches were my guys.”

Bogar, who was a holdover from Terry Francona’s staff, insisted that his relationship with the players remained strong. “The only bad communication was between Bobby and everyone,” Bogar said. “The rest of the communication was great. I talked to the players daily about stuff. We talked about everything. The coaches talked about everything.”

Dustin Pedroia called Bogar a “calming voice” and Mike Aviles noted that he’d always go to Bogar with questions because “he’s one of those guys who has great communication skills.” Of course, McDonald writes that Valentine “resented the fact that the players often spoke with the coaching staff and not directly with him.”

But honestly, knowing what we know about Valentine and his inability to avoid making off-field headlines, if you were a player with an issue would you talk to him or a member of his coaching staff?

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.