Former Cardinals outfielder Chris Duncan overcoming brain tumor

9 Comments

The baseball family that includes ex-Cardinals pitching coach Dave Duncan and his sons, former Cardinals outfielder Chris and the still active major leaguer Shelley, suffered a big blow last year when Dave’s wife, Jeanine, was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Dave was away from the  Cardinals for much of the 2011 season, and he remained on a leave of absence for the duration of 2012.

While Jeanine has continued her fight with cancer this year, the family got an even bigger shock at the end of September, as Chris was diagnosed with a brain tumor of his own, he tells the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Flown down on a Cardinals’ owner’s private jet, Duncan received treatment at the same Duke University medical facility that his mother did. Surgery took place Oct. 10, and now he’s getting chemo.

“They took out 95 percent of the tumor, there was a little bit left,” Chris Duncan said. “They said most of the tumor was Stage 2 cancer, there was a little piece that was a Stage 4 — but that was a small piece of it.”

The tumor was in his speech area of the brain, so he wasn’t able to talk for the first week after the operation.

“I remembered the surgery the next day, but the swelling grew, then I was out of it for a week,” he said. “Then I woke up and I started gradually getting better. I remember waking up and seeing the Cardinals led the Giants 3-1. I didn’t remember anything about the Washington series.”

Doctors aren’t sure if Duncan and his mother were both exposed to something that led to the tumors. Chris did get a lot of X-rays for his neck problems that ended his career, and he wonders if that has something to do with it.

Chris, who is just 31, played five years with the Cardinals before having to call it quits, hitting .257/.348/.458 with 55 homers in 1,147 at-bats. He’s currently doing sports talk radio in St. Louis, and he’s hoping to return to the air next week.

The Baltimore Orioles did not try to get Shohei Ohtani . . . out of principle

Getty Images
10 Comments

Shohei Ohtani made it pretty clear early in the posting process that he was not going to consider east coast teams. As such, it’s understandable if east coast teams didn’t stop all work in order to put together an Ohtani pitch before he signed with the Angels. The Baltimore Orioles, however, didn’t do so for a somewhat different reason than all of the other also-rans.

Their reason, as explained by general manager Dan Duquette on MLB Network Radio yesterday was “because philosophically we don’t participate on the posting part of it.” Suggesting that, as a matter of policy, they will not even attempt to sign Japanese players via the posting system.

Like I said, that probably didn’t make a hill of beans’ difference when it came to Ohtani, who was unlikely to give the O’s the time of day. I find it really weird, though, that the Orioles would totally reject the idea of signing Japanese players via the posting system on policy grounds. None of their opponents are willing to unilaterally disarm in that fashion, I presume.

More than that, though, why would you make that philosophy public? Don’t you want your rivals to think you’re in competition with them in all facets of the game? Don’t you want your fans to think that you’ll stop at nothing to improve the team?

An odd thing to say for Duquette. I don’t know quite why he’d say such a thing.