Don’t expect to see Jose Valverde pitch for the Tigers again

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Asked about Jose Valverde’s latest terrible outing in Game 1 of the World Series last night, Tigers manager Jim Leyland replied: “You know, he wasn’t terrible. He just wasn’t good.”

That’s about as nice as he could possibly phrase things considering Valverde has now allowed nine runs while recording a grand total of five outs in his last three appearances.

And they may be his final appearances, both of the season and for the Tigers. Valverde replied “you never know, you have to play until it’s over” when asked last night he expected to pitch again versus the Giants, reiterating that he felt his mechanics were improved after making some between-series adjustments with pitching coach Jeff Jones.

It’s worth noting that Valverde’s velocity was plenty good last night, with his fastball consistently clocking in at 92-94 miles per hour, but after striking out pitcher Tim Lincecum the Giants’ actual hitters went double, single, single, single off Valverde before Leyland removed him for Joaquin Benoit.

Valverde insisted that “I never lose my confidence” but even if that’s somehow true the same obviously can’t be said about Leyland’s confidence in the longtime closer and at this point it’d be surprising to see the impending free agent make another appearance for the Tigers.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.