Mariners send out apology to season ticket holders for raising prices without warning

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Recently the Mariners raised many of their season ticket prices without warning season ticket holders first and yesterday the team issued the following apology:

We apologize. The Mariners organization works hard to have an open line of communication with our Season Ticket Holders, whom we value and consider the backbone of our fan base. However, recently we sent you a season ticket renewal notice without making it clear that there were price increases for many accounts. We had planned to have our account managers speak personally to all our Season Ticket Holders to explain the changes for 2013 and get your feedback. That didn’t happen in a timely manner.

Our goal was to provide you with personalized attention. Unfortunately, we didn’t get it right. We recognize the financial and emotional investment you have made in Mariners Baseball. We are sorry for our miscommunication. And we pledge to do better. Thank you for your support and we hope you will contact your account manager directly with any concerns or questions.

Sincerely,

Bob Aylward, Executive Vice President, Business Operations

Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times writes that some fans were upset about the prices going up, period, but mostly they were annoyed by the lack of notice. And of course the whole thing happening after a third straight losing season probably didn’t help matters either.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.