Jon Jay loves himself some home cookin’

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That Cardinals leadoff man Jon Jay has struggled at the plate in the postseason is undeniable. Also undeniable: the Cardinals have played seven games on the road and just four at home.

Playing a second straight game in St. Louis on Thursday, Jay went 2-for-5 with a two-run double in the Cardinals’ 8-3 win over the Giants. It raised his postseason average to .195.

In 2012, Jay has simply been a different player at home. In the regular season, he had one of the more dramatic splits you’ll ever see:

Home: .384/.453/.496 in 224 AB
Away: .224/.289/.301 in 219 AB

It’s carried over into October, too. He’s 5-for-16 with six RBI in home games and 3-for-25 with one RBI the rest of the time.

Of course, most likely, this whole thing is one big fluke. Busch Stadium isn’t a hitter friendly park, though it does play better for left-handed hitters than right-handers. Also, Jay was actually better in road games than home games last year.

Still, Jay is probably the happiest of the bunch about the Cardinals possessing home-field advantage in the World Series, should they win one of the next three games and move on. It’d be the first time in the postseason that they’d have home field.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”