True Yankee Watch: 2012 ALCS edition

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Sorry, but I can’t get enough of members of the Yankees commentariat trying to outdo one another to draw the broadest, most dramatic conclusions from the results of three games.  It’s great fun.

The latest is Ian O’Connor of ESPN New York who uses the Yankees’ ALCS meltdown to help us identify who are and who are not True Yankees. Which is an exercise that I didn’t think anyone was still doing, but whatever:

Rodriguez spent the night in a gray hooded sweat jacket, chewing sunflower seeds in the dugout, and he could be finished as a Yankee. The dynastic holdovers — Jeter, Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte — all suffered serious leg injuries in their advanced age, and the team’s best in-his-prime player, Cano, is a room-temperature star lacking that unbreakable Jeter/Rivera/Pettitte drive.

Even with two wild cards there to cushion the fall, this could be the beginning of the end of the Yankees as we knew them. CC Sabathia, one of the few Yanks cut from the dynasty makers’ mold, surely will put up a fight Wednesday night, but what’s the point?

Notes:

  • I have a totally non-ironic love for O’Connor’s use of the phrase “room temperature” here to describe Cano. I assume he means it as a synonym for death (i.e. he has assumed room temperature) and as a fan of pulp detective fiction and film noir, that just pushes all of my buttons;
  • Say what you want about the greatness of Jeter, Pettitte and Rivera, but calling anything about those three “unbreakable” this year is counterfactual; and
  • Anyone know why Sabathia is “cut from the dynasty makers’ mold?”  It can’t be because he’s part of a dynasty, can it, because he’s still got just the one ring. It’s almost as if being cut from that mold means “not stinking at the particular moment at which I am writing this column.”

Oh well. Only a few more hours to read this kind of stuff until the next game. If they lose, there will be even graver post-mortems. If they win there will no doubt be some more True Yankees to discuss.

Yankees GM Brian Cashman not considering demoting struggling Greg Bird

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Yankees first baseman Greg Bird gave his team tons of confidence to hand him the everyday job at first base to start the 2017 regular season, batting .451/.556/1.098 with eight home runs in 51 spring at-bats. But he’s followed that up by hitting .107/.254/.214 through the first month of the regular season.

GM Brian Cashman doesn’t have any intent to demote Bird back to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports. Cashman said, “It’s not even an option for me in my mind right now, at all.”

Bird didn’t start Sunday’s game against the Orioles, a 7-4 loss in 11 innings. Lefty Wade Miley started for the Orioles, prompting manager Joe Girardi to put Chris Carter into the lineup at first base. If Bird isn’t able to figure things out, Carter might have an increased role on the team.

Chris Archer threw behind Jose Bautista

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Rays starter Chris Archer threw his first pitch to Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista behind the slugger’s back with one out in the first inning of Sunday afternoon’s game in Toronto. Bautista and Archer then had a staredown. Home plate umpire Jim Wolf issued warnings to both teams. Bautista ultimately flied out to right field and he appeared to have a quick word with Archer on his way back to the dugout.

Archer could have been exacting revenge — euphemistically known as “protecting his teammate” — because Jays reliever Joe Biagini hit Rays outfielder Steven Souza in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game. Souza was forced to leave the game and underwent an X-ray, which came back negative. He was held out of Sunday’s lineup. Biagini’s pitch did not appear to be intentional.

The Jays won Sunday’s contest 3-1 with no further incident. The two clubs meet again in Tampa for a three-game series starting on May 5, so we’ll see if Sunday was the last of the bad blood between them.