MLB’s media dress code not universally well-received

41 Comments

Before the season began, Major League Baseball instituted a dress code for reporters, the requirements of which aren’t universally well-regarded, especially by some women.

In part because the restrictions make working in the hot summer weather pretty uncomfortable. In part because of potential double-standards. And in part because it seems like it’s addressing either a non-existent issue or addresses a problem the solution to which should not fall solely on the reporters.

Jane McManus of ESPNW has an article up about it today:

One woman who, like many, asked that her name and affiliation not be used, said the policy — which bans short skirts, short dresses, short shorts, tank tops, sheer clothing, flip-flops, and one-shouldered and strapless shirts — often left her uncomfortable in the oppressive heat.

“It reminded me of Middle Eastern dress requirements, because you can wear sleeveless shirts in the workplace [but you can’t at a baseball game],” she said.

The article goes into greater detail, talking to some women reporters with various takes on the matter, including how boorish athlete behavior and the desire to not rock a boat that still isn’t totally comfortable with women in the locker room plays into it all.

For what it’s worth, to the extent I’ve been around press boxes both before and after the new rules, I can’t recall any woman baseball writer wearing anything that would be out of compliance anyway. Or even if it came close to the line, nothing that should be banned by anyone.

Indeed, the worse offenses against fashion and taste you usually see are from the men, most of whom haven’t gotten the memo that pleated Dockers cause cancer. Or at least probably do.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

Jamie Squire/Getty Images
5 Comments

Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.

Luis Valbuena to miss four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring

Kent Horner/Getty Images
1 Comment

Angels first baseman Luis Valbuena will miss the next four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring, Pedro Moura of the Los Angeles Times reports.

Valbuena, 31, signed a two-year, $15 million contract with the Angels in January and was on track to get the lion’s share of the playing time at first base. While he’s out, however, C.J. Cron will handle first base on a regular basis. When Valbeuna returns, the two will likely form a platoon.

Last year with the Astros, Valbuena hit a solid .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances.