MLB’s media dress code not universally well-received

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Before the season began, Major League Baseball instituted a dress code for reporters, the requirements of which aren’t universally well-regarded, especially by some women.

In part because the restrictions make working in the hot summer weather pretty uncomfortable. In part because of potential double-standards. And in part because it seems like it’s addressing either a non-existent issue or addresses a problem the solution to which should not fall solely on the reporters.

Jane McManus of ESPNW has an article up about it today:

One woman who, like many, asked that her name and affiliation not be used, said the policy — which bans short skirts, short dresses, short shorts, tank tops, sheer clothing, flip-flops, and one-shouldered and strapless shirts — often left her uncomfortable in the oppressive heat.

“It reminded me of Middle Eastern dress requirements, because you can wear sleeveless shirts in the workplace [but you can’t at a baseball game],” she said.

The article goes into greater detail, talking to some women reporters with various takes on the matter, including how boorish athlete behavior and the desire to not rock a boat that still isn’t totally comfortable with women in the locker room plays into it all.

For what it’s worth, to the extent I’ve been around press boxes both before and after the new rules, I can’t recall any woman baseball writer wearing anything that would be out of compliance anyway. Or even if it came close to the line, nothing that should be banned by anyone.

Indeed, the worse offenses against fashion and taste you usually see are from the men, most of whom haven’t gotten the memo that pleated Dockers cause cancer. Or at least probably do.

Mariners acquire Nick Rumbelow from Yankees

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The Mariners acquired Yankees’ right-hander Nick Rumbelow in exchange for minor league righty Juan Then and left-hander JP Sears, per an official announcement on Saturday. Rumbelow made 17 appearances for the Yankees in 2015 before undergoing Tommy John surgery and could provide some bullpen depth for the Mariners in 2018.

The 26-year-old right-hander spent the majority of his 2017 season in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, where he delivered an 0.62 ERA, 2.5 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 over 29 innings. The Yankees didn’t rush Rumbelow into a full workload after he missed the 2016 season recovering from Tommy John, but he didn’t appear to have any significant setbacks with his health or performance and should be ready to compete for a role next spring.

Sears, 21, was ranked 21st in the Mariners’ organization by MLB Pipeline. He was drafted in the 11th round of the 2017 draft and features a deceptive, low-velocity fastball that he can throw for strikes to either side of the plate. In his first year of pro ball, he split 17 games between Short-Season A Everett and Single-A Clinton, turning in an 0.65 ERA, 3.9 BB/9 and 16.6 SO/9 across two levels.

Then, 17, also completed his first year of pro ball after signing with the Mariners as a free agent. He went 2-2 in 13 games of rookie ball, pitching to a 2.64 ERA, 2.2 BB/9 and 8.2 SO/9 in 61 1/3 innings. Neither Sears nor Then will take the mound for the Yankees anytime soon, and offloading Rumbelow to the Mariners should clear up some room on New York’s 40-man roster as they prepare for the upcoming Rule 5 Draft.