UPDATE: Olbermann’s Yankees-Marlins A-Rod trade report already shot down

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UPDATE: That was fast:

 

And let’s not forget that A-Rod has a full no-trade clause. If he was going to allow a trade anywhere it may be Miami because he lives there, but really, this makes no sense.

3:15 PM: Take this with a considerably large grain of salt. Because while, yes, Keith Olbermann is a member of the media — formerly a member of the sports media — and while he likely has contacts with the New York Yankees given who he is, where his season tickets are and all of that stuff, this doesn’t seem terribly plausible:

The New York Yankees have held discussions with the Miami Marlins about a trade involving their third baseman in crisis, Alex Rodriguez.

Sources close to both organizations confirm the Yankees would pay all – or virtually all – of the $114,000,000 Rodriguez is owed in a contract that runs through the rest of this season and the next five. One alternative scenario has also been discussed in which the Yankees would pay less of Rodriguez’s salary, but would obtain the  troubled Marlins’ reliever Heath Bell and pay what remains of the three-year, $27,000,000 deal Bell signed last winter.

Not plausible from a baseball perspective — why in the hell would the Yankees want Heath Bell? — but also implausible given the timing of it all. Since when do teams in the freaking playoffs have trade discussions with anyone? Also: Olbermann doesn’t really report baseball news, so I’m not sure why he’d get this sort of thing before anyone else.

It’s not crazy to think that the Yankees will try to shop Rodriguez this winter. But I have a really hard time believing that there is anything to this beyond loose “what if” chatter over the dregs of a bottle of scotch.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: