If the Yankees weren’t doomed before, they are now

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No, the Yankees probably weren’t beating the Tigers four times in five days either. Still, Wednesday’s rainout made the assignment that much tougher.

– Because they’re playing four games in four days, the Yankees have lost the ability to pitch Game 4 starter CC Sabathia on three days’ rest in Game 7. At best, he’ll be available for a couple of innings out of the pen. Their Game 7 options would be Phil Hughes and his achy back, David Phelps, Derek Lowe or perhaps someone not on the roster. They’d have the option of disabling Hughes and activating Ivan Nova, though that would mean losing Hughes for the World Series.

– The Tigers, on the other hand, suffer from no such problems there. Their Game 4 starter, Max Scherzer, wasn’t a candidate to come back and pitch later in the series. Justin Verlander would start Game 7 on four days’ rest.

– One of the things that makes it more difficult to reel off a winning streak in the postseason is that teams often have to use up their quality relievers to get their wins. In Games 3 and 4 against the Orioles, the Yankees had Rafael Soriano throw 3 1/3 innings and David Robertson throw three innings. They may well need similar efforts from those two if they hope to win Games 4 and 5 against the Tigers. Now with no days off between Games 5 and 6, the Yankees will likely head back to New York with a tired pen if they do somehow manage to survive.

– Detroit’s pen, on the other hand, just earned a day off for unexpected ace in Phil Coke. Coke said he’d be ready to go tonight regardless, but after throwing 3 2/3 innings the previous four days, he probably needed the little break.

OK, so that’s pretty minor. The Game 7 issue looks like a backbreaker, though.If they could find out a way to eke out wins the next two days, the Yankees’ chances wouldn’t have looked so bad with Hiroki Kuroda and Sabathia back in the Bronx. Instead, it’d now be TBA versus Verlander.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.