Nick Swisher on Yankee Stadium booing: “It hurts … sometimes I’m a sensitive guy”

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Nick Swisher broke from his usual “Roll Call” salute to fans in the Yankee Stadium bleachers yesterday because Bryan Hoch of MLB.com reports that he was “stung by jeers he heard from the home crowd” during Game 1 of the ALCS.

Here’s more from Swisher:

That’s the last thing that I ever thought would be in this ballpark, that people would get on you that bad. Especially your home, where your heart is, where you’ve been battling and grinding all year long. It’s just frustrating, man. You never want to be in that spot. It’s not like you’re trying to go out there and do bad on purpose. It’s just tough, man.

Swisher has played four years in New York and, based on those comments, apparently hasn’t noticed the Yankee Stadium crowd booing Alex Rodriguez on a semi-regular basis essentially that entire time.

Swisher added that he doesn’t like the personal attacks he’s heard within the boos:

Last night was pretty big. A lot of people saying a lot of things that I’ve never heard before. Prime example: I missed that [12th-inning Delmon Young] ball in the lights, and the next thing you know, I’m the reason that Jeter got hurt. It’s kind of frustrating. They were saying it was my fault. …

It hurts. Sometimes I’m a sensitive guy and some of the things people say, they get under your skin a little bit. I’ve been lucky to be here for the past four years, bro. We’re not going to go out like this. We’re going to go to Detroit and give everything we’ve got.

Blaming him for the Derek Jeter injury is silly, of course, but “I missed that ball in the lights” isn’t a magic wand that can be raised to remove all criticism, particularly considering Swisher is now hitting .167 in 45 career playoff games. He’s been terrible and the Yankee Stadium crowd, like many baseball crowds, often boos players who perform terribly. There’s not a whole lot else to it, although Swisher’s impending free agency does add an extra wrinkle.

I do, however, appreciate Swisher so perfectly fitting his reputation by including “bro” in his quote.

Robinson Cano hit his 300th home run last night

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Last night Robinson Cano hit a solo homer in the ninth inning of the Mariners’ loss to the Texas Rangers. It was his 22nd on the season. Though it was insignificant to the outcome of that game, it was significant to Cano: it was his 300th career homer.

While we’ve become accustomed to not caring much about home run milestones south of, say, 500, 300 homers for Cano is a big deal, as he’s only the third second baseman to cross that threshold in baseball history. The other two: Jeff Kent, at 377, and Rogers Hornsby at 301.

Cano, who turns 35 next month, has a career line of .305/.354/.495 and 1,179 RBI, 512 doubles and 33 triples to go with those bombs. He’s in his 13th big league season and still has six more years left on his deal with the Mariners. He’s averaged 24 homers a year since coming to the Mariners. While he’ll obviously trail off at some point — and while great second baseman’s have this weird habit of just suddenly falling off a cliff — it’s highly likely that he’ll finish his career as the all-time home run leader among second baseman. If he remains healthy he should also get over 3,000 hits in his career.

Cooperstown, here he comes.

Reds sign catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year deal

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Mark Sheldon of MLB.com reports that the Reds have signed catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year contract extension. The terms: $16 million total, with a $7.5 million club option for the 2022 season that has a $500,000 buyout. He also received a $1.75 million signing bonus.

The deal buys out all three of his arbitration years — he was going to be eligible for the first time this offseason — and the first year of his potential free agency. The club option buys a second. Barnhart made $575,000 this season.

Barnhart, 26, is finishing his second season as the Reds primary catcher. This year he’s hitting .272/.349/.399 with six homers and 42 RBI in 113 games. For his career he has a line of .257/.328/.366 in 330 major league games. His real value is defensive, however. He leads the National League in caught stealing percentage and number of base stealers caught (31-for-70, 44%) and leads all players at any position in the league in defensive WAR according to Baseball-Reference.com.