In bizarre fashion, Jose Valverde’s meltdown pays off for Tigers

21 Comments

For all of the drama, Detroit pulled out Saturday’s Game 1 by a 6-4 score in 12 innings. And thanks to Jose Valverde’s four-run ninth inning, the Tigers…

– were able to extend the Yankees pen prior to Hiroki Kuroda making his first ever start on three days’ rest on Sunday. Rafael Soriano and David Robertson both worked in extras. So did David Phelps, who would have been the long man Sunday had Kuroda struggled.

– hopefully guaranteed that Valverde will never work in another close game in the series. Valverde doesn’t seem to be deceiving anyone with his 92-94 mph fastball at the moment and he’s been struggling with his splitter for months. That Valverde was so awful in blowing his second straight lead should mean Jim Leyland will give Al Alburquerque and Octavio Dotel increased responsibility going forward, which is a very good thing for the Tigers.

The extra-inning game also resulted in Derek Jeter’s fractured ankle, putting him out for the postseason. The Tigers don’t want any credit for that, and they’d surely rather have beaten the Yankees at their best. That said, it certainly helps their chances of winning the ALCS that the Yankees will be without their captain the rest of the way.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
5 Comments

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.