Mets could begin contract talks with David Wright next week

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We heard earlier this week that the Mets are expected to open negotiations with David Wright by offering him an extension “in the neighborhood” of $100 million. Mets general manager Sandy Alderson already began his pitch to Wright in September, but Andy Martino of the New York Daily News hears that formal talks between the two sides could begin as soon as next week.

Mike Puma of the New York Post was told by a baseball source last weekend that it’s feasible a deal could get done by the World Series, but a Mets source told Martino that it’s “too soon to tell.” While the Mets would like to keep a long-term deal in the range of $100 million, it’s believed he could command a six- or seven-year deal worth $120 million or more.

Wright, who turns 30 in December, batted .306/.391/.492 with 21 home runs, 93 RBI and an .883 OPS in 156 games played this season. His contract includes a $16 million club option for 2013.

The Mets have yet to engage in any serious talks with R.A. Dickey, though they are expected to at some point in the near future. If they two sides are unable to make progress, it’s possible the National League Cy Young hopeful could be traded this winter. His contract includes a bargain $5 million club option for next season.

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

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Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.