Carlos Beltran is unstoppable

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Having spent most of his career with the Royals and Mets, Carlos Beltran hasn’t gotten to play in may postseasons. In fact, this is just his third in 15 major league seasons. However, he’s certainly made the most of his limited October action.

Beltran went 3-for-3 with two doubles and two walks in Friday’s Game 5 victory, giving him this ridiculous career postseason line: .375/.488/.817 with 13 homers in 104 at-bats. He’s scored 37 times, knocked in 23 runs and gone 9-for-9 stealing bases in 28 games. His K/BB ratio in 15/23.

Of course, Beltran has been a fine regular-season player too, going to seven All-Star Games and amassing three 30-homer seasons. Still, no one compares in the postseason. Beltran has the highest on-base percentage and slugging percentage of anyone with at least 60 plate appearances in the postseason. You may have heard of the two guys right behind him on the OPS list: Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.

In order to get Hall of Fame consideration, Beltran will probably need to play for a world champion before he’s all done. Otherwise, his postseason numbers may not be taken all that seriously. Currently 35, he still has a pretty good shot at 400 homers (334 now) and 1,500 RBI (1,243 now). His career .282/.360/.496 line pales in comparison to fellow Hall of Fame long shots Larry Walker and Lance Berkman, but Beltran was a Gold Glove-caliber center fielder for most of his first 10 seasons and it should be factored in that he spent the bulk of his career in pitcher’s parks. It’d be crazy to dismiss him.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.