Bud Selig: “We’d better” have expanded replay next season

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Bud Selig has repeatedly downplayed the outcry for expanded instant replay this year, which is why this comment from a Q & A with Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times on Thursday was pretty surprising and downright refreshing.

You have said you want to expand instant replay to include reviews of fair or foul balls and trapped balls. Will that expanded replay be in place for next season?

“I think we’ll have it for sure. They’re working on cameras in all the ballparks. We need the right cameras. Should we have them by next year? We’d better.”

That’s what we have longed to hear from Selig for a long time now, but actions speak much louder than words. Expanded replay for fair-or-foul balls and trapped-or-caught balls was actually negotiated into the new collective bargaining agreement last November, though the implementation was subject to negotiations between MLB and the umpires’ union. It was announced back in March that the two sides weren’t able to come to an agreement in time for this season. MLB also wants to make sure that they have the proper technology in place in all 30 parks. Let’s hope Selig has more sense of urgency to get this done than he has shown with the committee on the Athletics-to-San Jose case. Thursday’s answer was a pretty good start, though.

By the way, Shaikin’s Q & A is worth a read. Selig addresses a wide variety of topics, including the new Wild Card format and whether he showed a double standard by allowing the Moores to take $200 million in TV money from the recent sale of the Padres, but wouldn’t allow Frank McCourt to do the same with the Dodgers. Really interesting stuff.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.