Alex Rodriguez goes 0-for-3, gets removed for pinch-hitter

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Alex Rodriguez got the start on Saturday, but he wasn’t around for the finish. After going 0-for-3, he was removed for pinch-hitter Eric Chavez with the Yankees down to the Tigers 4-0 in the eighth inning of Game 1 of the ALCS.

Up with the bases loaded and two outs in the first, Rodriguez hit a hard grounder in his initial at-bat off Doug Fister, only to see Jhonny Peralta make a diving stop and get the force play at second. A-Rod then hit into a double play his second time up. Batting again with the bases loaded in the sixth, he struck out on three pitches from Fister. The last one was a curveball low and away that he didn’t come close to making contact on.

The hitless game left Rodriguez 2-for-19 with 10 strikeouts in the postseason. He doesn’t have a hit versus a right-hander, and the Tigers will start nothing but righties throughout the ALCS.

One imagines the miserable night will lead to Rodriguez sitting in favor of Chavez in Sunday’s Game 2. Chavez, for what it’s worth, very nearly had a double hitting for A-Rod tonight, but he was robbed on a great play from center fielder Austin Jackson.

Rodriguez could get another chance in Game 3 against Justin Verlander. It’d seem to be a horrible matchup with the way Rodriguez is struggling to catch up to good fastballs right now, but A-Rod is 8-for-24 with three homers lifetime against Verlander, including 4-for-6 with two homers this year.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.