Jayson Werth delivers walkoff homer vs. Cardinals to force a Game 5 in NLDS

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We’re going to have yet another Game 5 in this already thrilling postseason.

Jayson Werth clubbed a walkoff solo homer to lead off the bottom of the ninth inning this evening to power the Nationals to a 2-1 victory over the Cardinals in Game 4 of the NLDS. It forces a fifth and deciding game in the series tomorrow night in Washington, D.C.

The home run came on the 14th pitch of an intense duel with Lance Lynn where Werth battled back from 0-2 and fouled off a number of tough pitches. But he eventually found a pitch to his liking and put it over the left field fence and into the bullpen for the first playoff win in Washington, D.C. since 1933.

Ross Detwiler allowed an unearned run over six six innings before Jordan Zimmermann, Tyler Clippard and Drew Storen combined for three innings of shutout relief. Eight of the nine outs recorded by the trio were via the strikeout, though they did get some help from a very questionable strike zone from home plate umpire Jim Joyce. Pete Kozma drew a walk with two outs in the top of the ninth and likely would have scored on a bloop into shallow left field off the bat of Matt Carpenter, but Ian Desmond was able to chase it down while making an impressive over-the-shoulder catch.

Kyle Lohse was very solid in a no-decision, allowing just one run on two hits and walk over 7 2/3 innings. His only mistake was a solo home run by Adam LaRoche in the second inning, but he simply didn’t get enough help from his offense on this day.

We’ll get a rematch from Game 1 tomorrow night, as Adam Wainwright will get the call for the Cardinals and Gio Gonzalez will pitch for the Nationals.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.