Looking ahead to a full slate of division series action today

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Four games, two possible eliminations. Let’s see what the playoffs have in store for us today:

Cardinals vs. Nationals, 1:07 PM, MLB Network

The Nats and Cards split in St. Louis and now play a best of three in Washington, which will host its first playoff game since 1933.  The back-from-the-dead Chris Carpenter faces off against Edwin Jackson, whose last posteason win came in the 2011 NLDS for the Cardinals. The Cards offense exploded in Game 2, and Jackson needs to stop them or else the “why did they shut down Stephen Strasburg?” chorus will grow even louder.

Giants vs. Reds, 4:07 PM, TBS

An extra innings win last night was nice, but the Giants still have their backs up against the wall, facing elimination. They are also facing an offensive drought, having scored a mere four runs in three games while hitting .126. Barry Zito takes the hill for San Francisco. And if anyone says they would have predicted that he, rather than Tim Lincecum, would be the go-to guy in an elimination game, they’re lying like a cheap rug. With Johnny Cueto out, the identity of the Reds starter is still up in the air. It could be Mike Leake or Mat Latos.

Orioles vs. Yankees, 7:37 PM, TBS

This one has the feel of a series that is going to go all five, with each team beating the other’s brains out. The Yankees have the presumed pitching advantage here, with Hiroki Kuroda — perhaps their most reliable starter all year — facing off against Miguel Gonzalez. Of course, thanks to the New York media narrative, all eyes will be on and most announcer words will be about Alex Rodriguez, who has struggled mightily of late. Never mind that the entire team has struggled to some degree — Rodriguez didn’t strand all ten of those baserunners himself on Monday night — but that’s how it is when A-Rod is involved.

Tigers vs. Athletics, 9:37 PM, TBS

Speaking of cold bats, the Tigers have them now, as the A’s pitchers carved them up last night, cutting Detroit’s series lead to 2-1. A.J. Griffin will take the ball in the do-or-die game for Oakland. The very-banged-up-but-now-allegedly-healthy Max Scherzer goes for the Tigers. If he is on, the A’s may be in trouble. Scherzer’s second half performance was the stuff of aces. The last time we saw Griffin pitch, he was digging a hole for his teammates in game 162 against the Rangers.  If he does that again, he can’t count on being bailed out like he was last time. The rookie has pitched a lot more innings this year than he expected to, and he may be running out of gas.

Get your snacks ready and watch baseball all day long. I doubt your spouse or your boss will mind one bit. Tell them I said it’s cool.

Derek Norris signing with the Rays

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Yahoo Sports’ Tim Brown reports that Derek Norris is signing with the Tampa Bay Rays.

Norris was released by the Nationals nine days ago, made redundant by the Nats’ signing of Matt Wieters and by everyone sliding down a notch on the depth chart below him. Norris hit only .186/.255/.328 with 14 home runs and a .528 OPS for the Padres in 2016.

Still, there always seems to be a place for a backup catcher. For Norris that place is Tampa Bay.

The Braves are banning outside food. And they’re probably lying about why they’re doing it.

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Here’s a thing a lot of people don’t realize: there are a lot of ballparks that allow you to bring in outside food.

Not all of them, but a lot do. They don’t publicize it, obviously, because they want you to buy their expensive food, but if you go to the concessions policy page on most team’s websites, you can get the scoop. It often lists “soft-sided coolers” under “permitted items,” which is code for “yes, you can bring your own food in.” Some may specifically limit THAT to sealed plastic water bottles, but for the most part, if you can bring soft-sided coolers into the park, that means it’s OK to bring in grandma’s potato salad and a few sandwiches. They may check your coolers, of course, to make sure you’re not bringing in alcohol or whatever.

The Atlanta Braves have always allowed food into the ballpark. But thats going to change in shiny new Sun Trust Park. The AJC reports that the Braves have announced a new policy via which ticket holders will not be allowed to bring in outside food. Exceptions will be made for infant food and for special dietary restriction items.

Which, OK, it’s their park and their rules. If they want to cut out the PB&J for junior and force you to buy him a $9 “kids pack” — or if they want you to forego grandma’s potato salad to buy that pork chop sandwich we mentioned yesterday — that’s their choice. Everything else about the Braves new stadium has been about extracting money from fans, so why not the concessions policy too?

My beef with this is less about the policy. It’s about their stated reason for it:

The changes are a result of tighter security being put into place this season throughout the league, said the Braves spokesperson.

This, as the French say, is horses**t.

We know it is because not all teams are prohibiting outside food. If there are tighter security measures across the board, other teams are implementing them without the food restriction. Even the Yankees, who take security theater to extreme heights as it is, are still allowing fans to bring in their own food.

The Braves, I strongly suspect, are using these measures as an excuse to cut down on competition for their concessions. Which, like I said, go for it. Just be honest about what you’re doing and stop blaming “tightened security” for your cash grab.