The Nats rotation is a cause for concern? But I thought that was impossible!

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Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post on September 2:

The four-man rotation, primed for October that I’ve described is Gio Gonzalez, Jordan Zimmermann, Edwin Jackson and Ross Detwiler. So all of the pundits who say the Nats can’t go to the Series or even win it, just because they won’t have Strasburg, can kiss my press pass.

Barry Svrgula of The Washington Post, today:

Zimmermann’s start Monday continued a worrisome trend … Mix in poor starts from Jackson and Detwiler in blowout losses Sept. 28 and 30, respectively, with the shaky outings from Gonzalez and Zimmermann to open the postseason, and the Nationals’ most recent turn through the rotation against St. Louis has yielded 112 / innings, 16 walks and a 13.89 ERA.

Svrgula ends his column by noting that the Number One Starter Whose Name Must Not Be Spoken had a great start against the Cardinals just before his shutdown.

No, I don’t think that the Nats are toast. It’s tied for cryin’ out loud, and Edwin Jackson is capable of shutting anyone down. But the lesson of Game 2 — and really any playoff game in history — is that anything can happen. Your top pitchers can have bad outings sometimes, no matter how great they were in the regular season.

Which means that you can never have enough good pitchers. And which means that boorishly mocking anyone who dared suggest that maybe — just maybe — a team would like to have a pitcher like Stephen Strasburg in the playoffs was kinda silly.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.