Shaky Rolen should take a seat in Game 4

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As costly as it was, Scott Rolen’s second error of the NLDS, which scored the go-ahead run as the Reds lost in 10 innings, isn’t reason alone to stick him on the bench against San Francisco’s Barry Zito in Wednesday’s Game 4 in Cincinnati. But it doesn’t need to be.

In Todd Frazier, the Reds have a third baseman who posted an OPS 200 points higher than Rolen did against lefties this season. Rolen came in at .234 with one homer in 77 at-bats against southpaws. Frazier hit .298 with six homers in 124 at-bats.

Meanwhile, Rolen’s poor September has carried over to the postseason, as he’s opened the series against San Francisco 2-for-11. Frazier struggled during the season’s final month, too, but he outhit Rolen over the rest of the year. As a third baseman, he’ll never be confused with prime Rolen. But then neither will the 37-year-old version of Rolen manning the hot corner right now.

The Reds don’t need to make a permanent Rolen-for-Frazier switch at third. It’s doubtful Dusty Baker would even entertain the thought. Still, plugging in Frazier against the lefty in the second of three possible games in three days makes plenty of sense. The Reds managed Rolen’s playing time carefully all year anyway, and the lineup could use Frazier’s extra pop.

Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

Danny Farquhar
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Awful news for the White Sox and reliever Danny Farquhar: the right-hander remains hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage, per a team announcement on Saturday. He’s in stable but critical condition after sustaining a “ruptured aneurysm [that] caused the brain bleed” on Friday.

Farquhar, 31, passed out in the dugout during the sixth inning of Friday’s game against the Astros. He regained consciousness shortly after the incident and was taken to RUSH University Medical Center, where he’s expected to continue treatment with Dr. Demetrius Lopez in the neurological ICU unit.

“It takes your breath away a little bit,” club manager Rick Renteria said following the game. “One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what’s going on. […] When one of your teammates or anybody you know has an episode, even if it’s not a teammate, something is going on, you realize everything else you keep in perspective. Everything has its place. It’s one of our guys, so we are glad he was conscious when he left here.”