It is apparently “tremendously unethical and unfair” for MLB to schedule playoff games like it always has

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Earlier I laughed at Nats fans who were complaining about the start time of tomorrow’s playoff game. But I’ll acknowledge this much: it’s ok to complain some. I mean, it is kind of annoying when your team gets stuck with a game you can’t watch. Shucks. Darn. That sort of thing seems quite alright.

The problem is when it goes beyond a mild complaint and turns into some entitlement-based outrage. I mean we can all agree, can we not, that it’s not a violation of some fundamental right or a transgression of ethics or human decency for a playoff game to be on at 1PM, right? Oh, wait:

Of course, this is tremendously unethical and unfair to the thousands of DC residents who are unable to afford to attend the game or afford the high cost of cable and satellite service (not to mention the additional costs for MLB Network). This migration of sports to pay TV is particularly troubling given the massive public subsidies, tax exemptions and antitrust exemptions we’ve given the leagues. By moving games — particularly playoff games — to pay TV packages and forcing fans to spend even more money to watch games, the leagues are abusing that relationship.

MLB should allow DC 50 or one of the local stations to retransmit the MLB Network feed of tomorrow’s game immediately.

If you feel that way, go join the fight. Alternatively you could wake up and realize that Major League Baseball is a business that has been operating this way for as long as anyone can remember and don’t act so surprised and outraged. And that there is no way on Earth that baseball is going to give up an MLB Network broadcast to free TV simply because some Nats fans are upset.

Bonus question: Nats games are on cable (MASN). If Nats games on cable are such a violation of societal norms, why weren’t you fighting this fight a few years ago?

Danny Farquhar taken to hospital after fainting in dugout

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White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar passed out in the dugout after completing his outing against the Astros on Friday evening. The cause of the incident has yet to be determined, but Farquhar was supervised by the club’s medical personnel and EMTs and regained consciousness before being taken to Rush University Medical Center for further treatment and testing. A diagnosis has not been announced by the team.

Farquhar pitched 2/3 of an inning in relief during Friday’s 10-0 loss to Houston. He was brought in to relieve James Shields in the top of the sixth inning and was immediately bested by George Springer, who belted a ground-rule double down the right field line and scored Brian McCann and Derek Fisher for the Astros’ sixth and seventh runs of the night. He recovered to strike out Jose Altuve, but was again punished with a two-run homer from Carlos Correa (his first of two), and induced a fly out to end the inning.

The 31-year-old righty pitched just 7 1/3 innings with the club prior to Friday’s performance, issuing four hits, three runs, two homers and eight strikeouts in seven appearances.