It is apparently “tremendously unethical and unfair” for MLB to schedule playoff games like it always has

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Earlier I laughed at Nats fans who were complaining about the start time of tomorrow’s playoff game. But I’ll acknowledge this much: it’s ok to complain some. I mean, it is kind of annoying when your team gets stuck with a game you can’t watch. Shucks. Darn. That sort of thing seems quite alright.

The problem is when it goes beyond a mild complaint and turns into some entitlement-based outrage. I mean we can all agree, can we not, that it’s not a violation of some fundamental right or a transgression of ethics or human decency for a playoff game to be on at 1PM, right? Oh, wait:

Of course, this is tremendously unethical and unfair to the thousands of DC residents who are unable to afford to attend the game or afford the high cost of cable and satellite service (not to mention the additional costs for MLB Network). This migration of sports to pay TV is particularly troubling given the massive public subsidies, tax exemptions and antitrust exemptions we’ve given the leagues. By moving games — particularly playoff games — to pay TV packages and forcing fans to spend even more money to watch games, the leagues are abusing that relationship.

MLB should allow DC 50 or one of the local stations to retransmit the MLB Network feed of tomorrow’s game immediately.

If you feel that way, go join the fight. Alternatively you could wake up and realize that Major League Baseball is a business that has been operating this way for as long as anyone can remember and don’t act so surprised and outraged. And that there is no way on Earth that baseball is going to give up an MLB Network broadcast to free TV simply because some Nats fans are upset.

Bonus question: Nats games are on cable (MASN). If Nats games on cable are such a violation of societal norms, why weren’t you fighting this fight a few years ago?

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.