Nationals’ celebration involved 60 bottles of champagne and 480 cans of beer

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I’ve always wondered what exactly goes into a team’s celebration after clinching a playoff spot and James Wagner of the Washington Post has some details on the Nationals’ post-division title bash Monday night:

The revelry was organized and the cleanup spearheaded by longtime clubhouse manager Mike Wallace. For the celebration, he ordered 60 bottles of Korbel and Dom Perignon 2002 and 20 cases of Miller Lite, or 480 cans, and had them chilling on ice in blue beverage containers. (And, of course, there was some sparkling apple cider for Bryce Harper and Adam LaRoche’s son, Drake, to drink.)

And that doesn’t even include all the money spent on goggles.

Drew Storen called it “a war zone” and the aftermath included the clubhouse manager “heat cleaning, shampooing and drying the carpet” until 5:00 a.m. the next morning.

To raise money for charity the Nationals are offering the empty champagne bottles from the celebration for $100 or you can buy just a cork for $50. Seriously.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.