Craig Kimbrel

Craig Kimbrel first in history to fan half his batters faced

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Braves closer Craig Kimbrel struck out three out of the four Pirates he faced Wednesday to become the first pitcher in major league history to fan at least half of the batters he faced.

Kimbrel racked up 116 strikeouts while facing 231 batters. That’s more than four strikeouts for each of the 27 hits he allowed. He struck out more than eight times as many batters as he walked (14), which is perhaps the most stunning stat of all for those of us who saw him as a prospect a few years back. He walked fewer batters in 62 2/3 innings this year than he did in 20 2/3 innings (16) following his arrival to the majors in 2010.

The record Kimbrel set today barely even requires a minimum-inning requirement. Not only is Kimbrel the first to do it in minimum 50 or 60 innings, but he’d be the first to do it with a minimum of six innings. Francisco Rodriguez struck out 13 of the 21 batters he faced after joining the Angels in Sept. 2002. He pitched 5 2/3 innings that month before becoming a postseason hero. No one else has done it over as few as three innings.

John Gibbons texts Mark Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September.”

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - OCTOBER 2:  Mark Buehrle #56 of the Toronto Blue Jays pitches during the second inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on October 2, 2015 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
Brian Blanco/Getty Images
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Mark Buehrle hasn’t officially retired, but he hasn’t thrown a pitch in professional baseball since last October. Still, the Blue Jays wouldn’t mind having some insurance, so manager John Gibbons recently texted Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September,” Sportsnet’s Ben Nicholson-Smith reports.

Buehrle’s response? He texted back a picture of a lake. Sounds like he’s not interested in making a return, at least this year.

Last year, at the age of 36, Buehrle went 15-8 with a 3.81 ERA with a 91/33 K/BB ratio in 198 2/3 innings while leading the league with four complete games. He fell 1 1/3 innings shy of a 15th consecutive 200-inning season. There are many worse ways to end a career.

New Jersey woman files suit against the Brewers after being struck by a batting practice foul ball

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - APRIL 11: New protective netting now protects lower deck fans from dugout to dugout at Citizens Bank Park before an opening day game between the San Diego Padres and Philadelphia Phillies on April 11, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
Rich Schultz/Getty Images
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A woman from Camden County in New Jersey has filed suit against the Milwaukee Brewers after being struck by a foul ball during batting practice two years ago at Miller Park, Jeff Goldman of NJ.com reports. According to her lawsuit, she suffered an orbital fracture to her left eye socket, nerve and iris damage, and a concussion.

The woman, Dana Morelli, was in the second row behind third base along with her fiancee and his son when she was struck by the foul ball. She had to remain in a dark room in Milwaukee before being able to safely travel home. (Sensitivity to light is a common symptom of a concussion.)

Fan safety has become a hot button topic recently. This past December, Major League Baseball issued safety recommendations but ultimately left it up to each ballpark to decide by how much to extend the netting.

Earlier this month, Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis fouled off a pitch that struck a fan. After the game, he clamored for the Phillies to increase protective netting at Citizens Bank Park to extend to the seats behind the dugout, where the fan was hit. Another fan was hit the next day and Galvis threw up his hands in frustration. While fans and owners seem to mostly be against netting, the players seem to be for it.