And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Don’t you love the word “penultimate?” Me too!

Yankees 4, Red Sox 3: It took twelve innings, but Raul Ibanez’s heroics won the day. He homered off Boston closer/arsonist Andrew Bailey to bring the Yankees back from a 3-1 deficit in the ninth and then he singled in the improbably-in-the-game Frankie Cervelli to walk it off.

Orioles 1, Rays 0: Both the Orioles and the Rays seasons in a nutshell. The Rays got a fantastic performance from James Shields (CG, 2 H, 1 R, 15K), but no offense to speak of. The Orioles got a fantastic group effort from the pitchers and prevailed in a one-run game.  The O’s have to win again today and hope for a Yankees loss to force a one-game playoff for the AL East title tomorrow.

Athletics 3, Rangers 1: People took me to task on Twitter yesterday when I said that the Rangers had “collapsed.” I think they were right. It is the case that the Athletics have played out of their minds and that, overall, the Rangers have basically been the Rangers for the past month and change.  But it is true that they had a five game lead a little over a week ago. They’ve dropped four of five head-to-head to Oakland and are one more loss away from being in a wild card game in which they never figured on playing. Not a collapse, I’ll grant you, but definitely a butt-kicking.

Reds 3, Cardinals 1; Giants 4, Dodgers 3: Bye-bye Dodgers. It was a nice run, much of it made when they had nowhere close to the talent level your typical contender possesses, but it wasn’t meant to be. However, if all of those guys they acquired over the summer play at their established norms or even, shock, have a slightly better-than-normal year in the next couple, L.A. will be a force.

Royals 4, Tigers 2: Over the years there have a been a few guys I figured had a run at a triple crown in them. Don Mattingly, maybe, at least for a couple of years in the mid 80s. Gary Sheffield. Manny. Some freak of nature the Colorado Rockies signed and CoorsHabilitated.  Miguel Cabrera has had that look ever since he first joined the Marlins. A rare bird. A perfect hitter with a perfect blend of greatness and consistency. He went 2 for 3 with two RBI. Barring a Josh Hamilton explosion today, dude is actually gonna win the triple crown.

Pirates 5, Braves 1: In honor of the Braves losing out on the NL East, Fredi Gonzalez apparently went to the Home Depot parking lot and found several guys to play in last night’s game. I mean, I know “Jeff Baker” is a real major leaguer, but it could just as easily be the name of a drifter who found himself stuck in Pittsburgh while he tries to scrape a bit together to get him up to Buffalo, where he heard there might be some work. Not much, but honest pay and a chance to maybe make something out of this life and forget about the past, where everything went wrong no matter what he tried to do. But now, he supposes, he’ll play a little right field, a little second base. Play the man’s game until he can make it to a world where he isn’t always gettin’ played. [long, thoughtful drag on a cigarette  lonesome harmonica music].

Marlins 4, Mets 3: Adam Greenberg has seen four major league pitches in his life. A 92 mile per hour fastball to the head and three R.A. Dickey knuckleballs with which he could do absolutely nothing. Probably a good time to hop on the motivational speaking circuit, dude.  Seriously, though: how Marlins is it to give him his one shot only to make him do it against the nastiest starter in the NL this year?  What, they couldn’t work him in against Craig Kimbrel last week?

Nationals 4, Phillies 2: Adam LaRoche was the only everyday player to stay in for more than five innings. While he did so, he hit a homer and topped 100 RBI for the year. Some fans even chanted “MVP” for him. They probably believed it too. Nationals fans are just so damn cute. Two homers for Darin Ruf.

Blue Jays 4, Twins 3: I always wondered if it’s hard to concentrate on baseball while you’re busy making plans for hunting trips and beach weekends with your girlfriend during a game. Blue Jays managed it OK.

Indians 4, White Sox 3: Adam Dunn has no fear. With the season over for Chicago, he could have sat out these last two games and not challenged the single season strikeout record. Nope: he faced it. And whiffed twice, tying Mark Reynolds for the record at 223. Play tomorrow, Dunner. Take what is rightfully yours.

Astros 3, Cubs 0: Getting shut out by the same 3-0 score to the worst team in baseball at home has to be one of the more ignominious ends to a season in baseball history. Maybe some team in 1919 had half the roster die from Spanish Flu or something. That would be worse. I guess.

Brewers 4, Padres 3: Martin Maldonado hit a grand slam. If the Braves played a lineup of drifters, the Brewers played a lineup of orphans. Indeed, they used ten rookies in this game.

Diamondbacks 5, Rockies 3: Aaron Hill with the walkoff three-run homer. Arizona’s season isn’t ending in the most satisfying manner, but at least it’s ending with some excitement.

Mariners 6, Angels 1: Mike Trout’s 1 for 5 dropped him to .324, so that’s that as far as the batting title goes. In other news, Kyle Sager hit a home run. Every Mariner pitcher is desperately using that as evidence that, no, they don’t need to move the fences in at Safeco next year. “Please, dear God, don’t do this to us,” they’re saying.

Travis d’Arnaud’s position in Wednesday’s box score read “3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B-3B-2B”

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The Mets had to scratch both Jose Reyes and Wilmer Flores an hour before Wednesday’s game against the Yankees due to ribcage injuries, so Travis d'Arnaud — normally a catcher — borrowed David Wright‘s glove and played third base for the first time in his career. He had played some third base in spring training, but as far as an official professional game goes, he’s never been there.

The first two batters the Yankees sent up to the plate in the first inning were left-handed. But when the right-handed Aaron Judge came up, manager Terry Collins swapped second baseman Asdrubal Cabrera with d’Arnaud. It became a thing. The two swapped once more in the first inning, three times in the second, once in the third, five times in the fourth, once in the fifth, three times in the sixth, four times in the seventh, once in the eighth, and twice in the ninth. It worked, as d’Arnaud didn’t have an opportunity to make a play until catching Todd Frazier‘s pop-up for the first out of the ninth inning — as a second baseman. Cabrera had a handful of opportunities, including immediately after having swapped with d’Arnaud.

The Mets lost 5-3. At the plate, d’Arnaud went 0-for-3 with a sacrifice fly. Cabrera was 1-for-4.

Matt Reynolds and Gavin Cecchini are being recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas so the Mets don’t have to do the “3B-2B shenanigans,” as MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo put it, again.

John Lackey stole the first base of his career

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Cubs starter John Lackey stole the first base of his 15-year career on Wednesday against the Reds. Of course, he spent the first 11 and a half years of his career in the American League, where opportunities to bat, let alone attempt to steal a base, were rare. Lackey entered Wednesday having taken 250 plate appearances, reaching base just 31 times on 17 singles, seven doubles, and seven walks for a .134 on-base percentage. One can imagine the 38-year-old is not exactly the swiftest base runner.

Still, Lackey managed to swipe a bag in the fourth inning. He singled with two outs against Homer Bailey. Then, with an 0-1 count on Ben Zobrist, Lackey broke for second even before Bailey began his windup. Tucker Barnhart stood up to alert Bailey that Lackey was running, so Bailey wheeled around and threw to second base, but Lackey slid into the bag easily safe. It wasn’t a pretty slide, but it did the job.

Lackey, however, was picked off of second base by Barnhart later that inning. Bailey threw a 3-2 fastball wide of the strike zone, walking Zobrist. Lackey had wandered too far off of second base, so Barnhart threw behind Lackey and the tag was applied by Zack Cozart. Lackey was called safe initially. The play was reviewed and the ruling on the field was overturned, ending the fourth inning.

Base Ba’al giveth and Base Ba’al taketh away.