Alfonso Soriano talks trade possibility, retirement

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Alfonso Soriano pulled off quite the rebound this season, hitting .262/.322/.499 with 32 homers and 108 RBI. Still, he’s not sure about his future with the Cubs and he’s weighing retirement once his contract ends, CSNChicago.com’s Patrick Mooney reports.

“It depends how long,” Soriano said when asked if he wants to stay with the Cubs. “If they want to rebuild for next year, I’ll be here. But if they want to take longer than two years, then they have to think about moving me out to another team that can win quickly. I have two more years on the contract and maybe I retire after that. I just want to have one more shot to go to the World Series before I retire.”

Soriano could have had that shot this year, but he said he wasn’t going to waive his no-trade clause when the Giants showed interest in him. He’s believed to prefer the East Coast if traded.

Soriano is still owed another $36 million, and while he seemed rejuvenated this year, there’s no way the Cubs could move him without eating a portion of what he’s owed. It’s something they are willing to do, though. Given the lack of quality corner outfielders available in free agency, there might be a couple of teams interested in taking a chance on Soriano come December or January.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.