Adam Greenberg to get his chance tonight. R.A. Dickey is ready for him.

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Adam Greenberg — the man whose sole big league plate appearance resulted in a beaning — is going to un-Moonlight Graham himself in tonight’s Marlins-Mets game.  He won’t start, but Ozzie Guillen said he will pinch hit him at some point in the game, likely when the outcome is not on the line.  Guillen says that, despite both teams being out of it, he is going to manage to win.

R.A. Dickey — the pitcher Greenberg is most likely to face — is playing to win too. Here’s what he says:

“He’s a big leaguer. I’m going to treat him like a big leaguer,” Dickey said. “That’s why he’s here. I would hope he wouldn’t want anything less than that. That’s certainly how I’m going to treat him. So if he comes up, he’s going to get a steady dose of my best. Whatever that is.”

I love the “whatever that is” line.  With Dickey that could be anything from his weird knuckler to his “fastball” to that changeup he whips out every once in a while.  Heck, it could be his powerful, paralyzing, poifect, pachydoimous, percussion pitch.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”