Yankees crush Red Sox, claim AL East lead over O’s

23 Comments

The Yankees exploded for nine runs in the second on the way to a 10-2 victory over the Red Sox on Monday and moved a game up on the Orioles for first place in the AL East after Baltimore lost to Tampa Bay 5-3.

The Bombers hit four homers as part of their huge frame, with Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson, Russell Martin and Mark Teixeira all going deep.

Martin’s homer was somewhat controversial, as a fan — in a Red Sox shirt, no less — reached over the wall with his cap in an attempt to haul it in. The ball, though, ended up bouncing off his wrist, suggesting that it would have hit off the top of the wall and bounced over if not for the interference. It was ruled a homer on the field, and the call went unchanged after being reviewed.

The Red Sox bounced back to outscore the Yankees 2-1 over the rest of the game, giving them something to build on for… no, really, who am I kidding?

CC Sabathia cruised to his 15th victory, allowing two runs and four hits in eight innings against a lineup that included two regulars (Cody Ross and Jarrod Saltalamacchia). Clay Buchholz allowed eight of the nine runs in the second and was pulled after 1 2/3.

Tampa Bay’s win was much closer, and it at least temporarily kept the Rays in postseason contention, pending Oakland’s result tonight. Alex Cobb allowed just one run and two hits in seven innings to improve to 11-9. Rookie Wei-Yin Chen gave up four runs — one earned — in 6 2/3 innings to take the loss, leaving him 12-11.

Fernando Rodney broke his tie with Dennis Eckersley and is now in position to sport the lowest ERA of all-time after pitching a scoreless ninth for his 47th save. He’s at 0.605, down from 0.614 to begin the day. The Rays wanted to get through the game without using Rodney, but after entering to begin the ninth, Kyle Farnsworth gave up a single and a homer in what had been a 5-1 game.

The Orioles will now need some help from the Red Sox to avoid slipping into the wild card position. The Rays still have a slight chance at the second wild card, but they’ll need the A’s to lose three straight to Texas.

There is, indeed, an MLB-to-Portland group

Associated Press
Leave a comment

On Monday, Baseball America reported that MLB is prepared to expand to Portland and Montreal. We talked about that at length yesterday. One of the most common responses to that piece has been “Portland? Really?”

There’s good reason for that response. Baseball-to-Portland has been talked about for years, but there has never been any real traction. Past initiatives have failed, significant public funding for a stadium seems to be a political impossibility and, heck, Portland wasn’t even interested in keeping its Triple-A team, turning its stadium into a much more successful soccer venue and not missing the Beavers all that much.

It would seem, however, that the reports are not mere speculation and there is a genuine baseball-to-Portland initiative afoot once again. From the Oregonian:

On Tuesday, former Trail Blazers broadcaster Mike Barrett confirmed to The Oregonian/OregonLive that he is part of the Portland group.

“I am officially involved with a campaign to bring Major League Baseball and a stadium development to Portland,” Barrett said. “There is also a formally organized, sophisticated and seasoned management group running this initiative. We will keep you fully apprised of any/all developments as this project progresses.”

One guy — a broadcaster no less — saying he’s part of a group is not exactly a major needle-mover, of course. But it does contrast with past Portland initiatives that have been well-publicized grassroots affairs. While those may have been more broad-based and while their public nature may have provided some refreshing transparency, the simple fact of professional sports ownership in the 21st century is that well-monied groups who play things close to the vest are more likely to make waves. We’re in an age when technocratic hedge fund-type guys make things happen in this arena, not in an age when flamboyant public personalities do.

None of which is to say that baseball in Portland is a lock or that expansion anywhere is a short term proposition. It’s just to note that, yeah, there is a bit more going on, it seems, than just pointing at a map and saying “yeah, a team would make sense here.”