Luke Hochevar’s horrible season ends with 10-run inning

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Despite sporting a 7-13 record and a 5.36 ERA, Luke Hochevar got a vote of confidence from the Royals’ organization earlier this month. He’s responded in classic Hochevarian fashion; he gave up 22 runs over 24 innings in his last four starts.

Hochevar’s season officially ended during the Indians’ 10-run fifth inning on Sunday. Hochevar didn’t give up all of the runs, but he was charged with nine in 4 2/3 innings, taking his ERA up to 5.73. It’s not the worst ERA in the majors — Ricky Romero came in at 5.76 — but considering that Kansas City’s Kauffman Stadium plays as a pitcher’s park, he rates as the AL’s least effective starter this year.

By Baseball-Reference’s ERA+. Hochevar’s season could end up rating the worst of any qualified starter since 2008. Tim Lincecum’s 2012 is actually worse right now (he’s at 68, the third worst mark since 2000), but the San Francisco park factor will likely be revised to something less extreme later on. Also, as rough as Lincecum’s season has been, he’s allowed just three unearned runs. Hochevar has allowed nine. Romero gave up six.

At least Hochevar can take solace that his season doesn’t rate as the worst in Royals’ history. The late Jose Lima went 5-16 with a 6.99 ERA in 32 starts for Kansas City in 2005.

Phillies, Jake Arrieta having a “dialogue”

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No, not like a Socratic dialogue, in which each side, in a mostly cooperative, but intellectually confrontational manner interrogate one another as a means of testing assertions and finding truths, though that would be an AMAZING thing for baseball players and teams to do. Rather, low-level talks about possible interest in Jake Arrieta, baseball free agent.

Arrieta is probably the top free agent still available, now that Yu Darvish, J.D. Martinez and Eric Hosmer have signed. Philly has money — it’s a big market — and could use a pitcher, but Jon Heyman, who, much like Plato did for Socrates, reported the dialogue, says they’re not looking to go long term with anyone.

It may make sense for Arrieta to take a so-called “pillow contract” and come back on the market in a year, but if he’s willing to accept a one-year deal, there are a lot of teams other than Philly who may offer one, and you’d have to figure Arrieta would prefer to pitch for a team more likely to contend.

Dialogues are cool, though. You should go have one over lunch.