Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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The National League playoff picture got a step closer to taking shape last night, as the Cardinals walloped the Nationals 12-2 at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals are three games up on the Dodgers and five ahead of the Brewers for the second Wild Card spot with just five games to play.

Edwin Jackson was hit really hard by his former team, giving up nine runs (eight earned) on six hits and four walks over just 1 1/3 innings. It was his shortest outing of the season.

Allen Craig went 4-for-4 in the victory while Yadier Molina added to his case for National League MVP by hitting his 22nd home run. Adam Wainwright bounced back from some recent shaky efforts to toss six innings of one-run ball. Despite the loss, Bryce Harper went 2-for-3 with a double and a run scored. His OPS is now over .800 (.804) for the first time since July 18.

Because the Braves lost to the Mets last night, the Nationals’ magic number to clinch the National League East is down to two. They could clinch it tonight with a victory and another Braves loss. As for the Cardinals, their magic number to clinch the second Wild Card is at three.

Your Saturday box scores:

Reds 1, Pirates 0

Red Sox 1, Orioles 9

Phillies 1, Marlins 2

Royals 5, Indians 8

Mets 3, Braves 1

Yankees 11, Blue Jays 4

Astros 7, Brewers 6

Angels 7, Rangers 4

Rays 1, White Sox 3

Cubs 3, Diamondbacks 8

Tigers 2, Twins 4

Giants 3, Padres 1

Mariners 2, Athletics 8

Rockies 0, Dodgers 8

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.