Report: the Dodgers got a sweetheart deal limiting their revenue sharing liability

12 Comments

UPDATE:  It seems this was not really news, despite Bloomberg’s reporting it as such.  Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reported this back in May.  We missed it then.  Apologies to the Times.

5:40 PMIf this report from John Helyar of Bloomberg is true, whoa, MLB is going to have A LOT of explaining to do to, well, every team that is not the Los Angeles Dodgers:

The Los Angeles Dodgers have shot out of bankruptcy and into the ranks of baseball’s biggest spenders, fueled partly by a secret agreement between former owner Frank McCourt and Major League Baseball that may limit the revenue the team is obliged to share with less prosperous clubs.

A settlement ending their 2011 battle in U.S. Bankruptcy Court gives the Dodgers’ new owners a chance to cap income subject to revenue-sharing from a proposed regional sports network at about $84 million a year, according to five people familiar with the confidential “special terms.”

The upshot: the Dodgers — based on assumptions about what their new TV deal will bring them — will be able to hold on to some $141 million a year that they would otherwise have to share with other clubs in the league. That’s because their new deal will bring in far, far more than $84 million a year. Indeed, its estimated that it’ll bring in $175 million to $225 million a year over the 20- year contract.

This would help in part to explain the massive sales price of the team, as the biggest financial hurdle a large market/revenue team faces is its revenue sharing obligations.

Major League Baseball Executive Vice President Rob Manfred pushes back against this, saying that the revenue sharing figures will be based on the actual TV revenue the Dodgers receive.  Which … seems like a direct contradiction of the whole story.  So, I’m not sure what’s going on here.  Bloomberg is obviously reporting, based on several sources, that there is a deal to cap revenue-sharing eligible TV money. Manfred’s words suggests that’s not the case.

Any help here, anyone?

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
1 Comment

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
Leave a comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.