Jayson Werth

Jayson Werth acts very Jayson Werthy in Philly

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Jayson Werth is a bit of an odd duck. He’s not a cliche guy. Indeed, he’s something of a curious speaker for a ballplayer. Hard to explain it exactly, but when you hear interviews with him you can sort of tell that he’s on a different mental track than a lot of baseball players. He’s often frank, but even when he’s not being frank he’s got a curious way of expressing himself. And there’s an emotional aspect to it too. Just different, ya know?

One of the other things about him is that he has, several times in the past, acknowledged fans and their behavior in ways most players don’t. Like, he’ll get into it and you can tell he pays way more attention to fan behavior than the vast majority of players who tune it out for the most part.

All of which just makes this story from last night’s Phillies-Nats game exceedingly Jayson Werthy. Late in the game, Werth was on the on deck circle when a ball came his way. He fake-tossed it to some kids in the crowd but then threw it into the dugout. Boos, predictably, rained down.  But Werth says it wasn’t like that. From John Finger at CSNPhilly:

“Earlier in the game I flipped a ball into the seats to a fan and it flipped off her hand and landed on someone else’s lap. Then a guy reached over — a Phillies fan — and grabbed the ball off her lap and threw it back onto the field,” Werth explained. “In the ninth I was going to flip the ball to a group of kids and behind them was all these unruly, middle-aged men who to me appeared to be snarling. It’s the ninth, so who knows. I got the sense that maybe they were intoxicated. I was going to flip it to the kids and then thought maybe not because of the group behind the little innocent children there, remembering what happened earlier in right field.”

Well, whatever, but “these unruly, middle-aged men who to me appeared to be snarling,” is the sort of phrase you’d expect to hear from some society man with a thin mustache as he tried to throw suspicion off of him while he’s being interviewed by detectives for an unexplained murder.

Turns out later, though, that the guy did kill the victim, outside of the opera house, while trying to make it look like random street crime.  An inheritance was involved, I figure. Not sure yet. Haven’t worked out all of the details yet. He obligingly tells the whole story to the cops with drama and exposition before the credits roll.

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.