Thanks to the mega Dodgers sale, Frank and Jamie McCourt are back in court

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Aww, I missed you guys! I really, really did!

The ex-wife of former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt wants to set aside the couple’s divorce settlement, claiming he vastly understated the value of a team that sold earlier this year for $2 billion, the highest figure ever paid for a pro sports franchise.

Jamie McCourt’s attorney, Bertram Fields, told The Associated Press that she “thought very long and very hard about whether to file this motion” but that after other means failed, she returned to court.

Jamie McCourt, you’ll recall, settled their divorce case for $131 million.  This was back when Frank McCourt didn’t look like he’d end up with a pot to piss in because absolutely no one figured he’d get $2 billion for the Dodgers.  At the time she and her quite able legal staff made what they thought was a good deal.

Her theory is fraud — that Frank misrepresented the value of the Dodgers.  I presume the counter will be that hanging on for the ride in the sale of a professional sports franchise is a risky endeavor and, by settling before the sale, Jamie decided not to assume any risk yet now wants the rewards of that sale.

I really don’t know the intricacies of rich people divorce cases, so I have no idea if she has a leg to stand on, legally speaking.  But my kneejerk reaction is to say that it takes an awful lot of chutzpah to sleep with the help, blow up the marriage, sue your ex, settle for well over $100 million as everyone in the world is also going after him and then, over a year later, come back and say “please, sir, I’d like some more.”

That said, the fact that I can muster any sympathy for a guy like McCourt here kind of turns my stomach, so maybe I should just root for expensive, protracted litigation that bankrupts them both and leaves no winners.

In the playoffs, the Yankees’ weakness has become their strength

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Two weeks ago, when the playoffs began, the idea of “bullpenning” once again surfaced, this time with the Yankees as a focus. Because their starting pitching was believed to be a weakness — they had no obvious ace like a Dallas Keuchel or Corey Kluber — and their bullpen was a major strength, the idea of chaining relievers together starting from the first inning gained traction. The likes of Luis Severino, who struggled mightily in the AL Wild Card game, or Masahiro Tanaka (4.79 regular season ERA) couldn’t be relied upon in the postseason, the thought went.

That idea is no longer necessary for the Yankees because the starting rotation has become the club’s greatest strength. Tanaka fired seven shutout innings to help push the Yankees ahead of the Astros in the ALCS, three games to two. They are now one win away from reaching the World Series for the first time since 2009.

It hasn’t just been Tanaka. Since Game 3 of the ALDS, Yankees pitchers have made eight starts spanning 46 1/3 innings. They have allowed 10 runs (nine earned) on 25 hits and 12 walks with 45 strikeouts. That’s a 1.75 ERA with an 8.74 K/9 and 2.33 BB/9. In five of those eight starts, the starter went at least six innings, which has helped preserve the freshness and longevity of the bullpen.

Here’s the full list of performances for Yankee starters this postseason:

Game Starter IP H R ER BB SO HR
AL WC Luis Severino 1/3 4 3 3 1 0 2
ALDS 1 Sonny Gray 3 1/3 3 3 3 4 2 1
ALDS 2 CC Sabathia 5 1/3 3 4 2 3 5 0
ALDS 3 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 7 0
ALDS 4 Luis Severino 7 4 3 3 1 9 2
ALDS 5 CC Sabathia 4 1/3 5 2 2 0 9 0
ALCS 1 Masahiro Tanaka 6 4 2 2 1 3 0
ALCS 2 Luis Severino 4 2 1 1 2 0 1
ALCS 3 CC Sabathia 6 3 0 0 4 5 0
ALCS 4 Sonny Gray 5 1 2 1 2 4 0
ALCS 5 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 8 0
TOTAL 55 1/3 35 20 17 20 52 6

In particular, if you hone in on the ALCS starts specifically, Yankee starters have pitched 28 innings, allowing five runs (four earned) on 13 hits and 10 walks with 20 strikeouts. That’s a 1.61 ERA.

While the Yankees’ biggest weakness has become a strength, the Astros’ biggest weakness — the bullpen — has become an even bigger weakness. This is why the Yankees, who won 10 fewer games than the Astros during the regular season, are one win away from reaching the World Series and the Astros are not.