Heath Bell’s teammates tried to shame him; Ozzie wouldn’t take his call

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We saw the Heath Bell/Ozzie Guillen drama as it was unfolding yesterday, but today Clark Spencer of the Herald has more details.

For starters, that whole bit where Greg Dobbs was ushering reporters out of the clubhouse while Ozzie was on the radio yesterday?  Here’s what that was about:

Reporters walked in unknowingly on the awkward clubhouse scene before being detected by players and ushered back out by Greg Dobbs. But sources said the point was for players to show they supported their manager and to humiliate Bell.

And Bell acknowledged later that, in the aftermath of his incendiary comments ripping the manager, his teammates probably had little respect for him anymore.

“Yeah,” Bell said, “I’ve pretty much lost all that.”

And Bell’s damage control continued, with him saying that he called Ozzie the night before to apologize and/or explain himself better. About that:

Bell said he phoned Guillen on Monday night to say he was sorry.

Guillen said he didn’t answer because he didn’t recognize the number. He also said that, by accident, he erased the message that Bell had left thinking it was from a media outlet wanting to talk to him about the incident.

“No matter what he said,” Guillen said, “it’s not going to resolve anything.”

Sounds like Heath Bell is persona non grata in the Marlins clubhouse.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.